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I am trying to understand iOS Core data transient properties and am having trouble understanding some behavior.

Setup

I have two contexts a Main and a Private context. I call them mainContext and threadedContext .

The threaded context is the parent context and the main context is the child context. (I did it this way because my threaded context alters the model far more frequently than my main thread and UI do.

I have transient properties who's value I need to pass through contexts.

I find that sometimes I loose the value and sometimes I don't depending on how I run things.

Sample

This code has been simplified to show the problem. I have a Person object. The Person object has a transient entity called "other" of which you will see I assign an Other object to it that has a couple simple properties, nothing more.

- (void)case1
{

NSManagedObjectContext *mainThreadContext = [AppDelegate appDelegate].mainThreadContext;
NSManagedObjectContext *threadedContext = [AppDelegate appDelegate].threadedContext;

__block NSManagedObjectID *objectID = nil;

[mainThreadContext performBlockAndWait:^{
    //create
    Person *aPerson = [self createAPersonOnContext:mainThreadContext];

    //setup
    Other *other = [[Other alloc] init];

    aPerson.other = other;

    aPerson.other.favoriteColor = @"Blue";
    aPerson.other.city = @"Provo";

    //save
    NSError *error = nil;
    [mainThreadContext save:&error];

    objectID = aPerson.objectID;

    NSLog(@"%@",aPerson);

}];    
}

When I retrieve the Object like this the person.other property is still set (note that I am saving AFTER I retrieve the object:

[threadedContext performBlockAndWait:^{
    Person *aPerson = [self getPersonOnContext:threadedContext withID:objectID];

    NSError *threadedError = nil;
    [threadedContext save:&threadedError];

    NSLog(@"threaded %@", aPerson);
}];

When I retrieve the Object like this the person.other is no longer set (note that I am saving BEFORE I retrieve the object)

[threadedContext performBlockAndWait:^{

    NSError *threadedError = nil;
    [threadedContext save:&threadedError];

    Person *aPerson = [self getPersonOnContext:threadedContext withID:objectID];

    NSLog(@"threaded %@", aPerson);
}];

I've tried different things including refreshObject:mergChanges: I've tried to watch when objects fault but that didn't appear to be helpful. Are transient values stored in a given context (assuming I have saved, or maybe not given the issue I am seeing) even if no model object is currently instantiated?

For those who feel they need more... The method getPersonOnContext:WithID looks like this:

- (Person *)getPersonOnContext:(NSManagedObjectContext *)context withID:(NSManagedObjectID *)ID
{
    __block Person *person = nil;
    [context performBlockAndWait:^{
        person = (Person *)[context objectWithID:ID];
    }];
    return person;
} 

The createAPersonOnContext: looks like this:

- (Person *)createAPersonOnContext:(NSManagedObjectContext *)context
{
    __block Person *person = nil;
    [context performBlockAndWait:^{
        person = (Person *)[NSEntityDescription insertNewObjectForEntityForName:@"Person"
                                                         inManagedObjectContext:context];
        person.firstName = @"matt";
        person.lastName = @"ZZZ";
    }];
    return person;
}

I just wanted to hide this code to help bring attention to the problem it self.

If you want to experiment with this I have it on github: https://github.com/mcmurrym/CoreDataBehaviors

Update:

It appears that when I save before using the ID to retrieve the object in the threaded context that it is faulting the Person object which destroys the transient values. If I retrieve the object in the threaded context before saving, the transient value is preserved because the object is not faulted.

share|improve this question
    
to understand core data, you can go through tutorial by raywenderlich.. raywenderlich.com/934/… –  vishy Nov 20 '12 at 6:05
    
That tutorial does not talk about transients as far as I could see. –  maxpower Nov 20 '12 at 14:35
    
Is there a particular reason why you have defined the "other" property as transient? –  Scott Ahten Nov 20 '12 at 14:56
    
Scott, yes, but that isn't what the question is about... I have in-memory information that I don't need to store on disk. –  maxpower Nov 20 '12 at 15:12
1  
If your object becomes a fault, it will loose its transient property when that fault is fulfilled. Saved objects can become faults, at the desecration of the context, based on how Core Data choses to manage memory. Saving a child context will push the changes into its parent content, rather than save it to the store. You can monitor Did and will turn into a fault to see if this occurs when you save the child. –  Scott Ahten Nov 20 '12 at 21:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

maxpower,

Transients are quite simple. They are properties that are always non-existent in the backing store. Hence, the fact that you ever see them is because you are using a child MOC and have externally assigned those values. To ensure that a transient is always valid, you need to consider implementing the -awakeFromInsert, -awakeFromFetch, -prepareForDeletion, -didTurnIntoFault and -willTurnIntoFault methods.

Andrew

share|improve this answer
    
right I understand this. but if I set a transient in contextA I shouldn't have to re-set the value of the transient property in contextB right? That is the whole point of transients, the ability to hold non-persistent in your modal and as a bonus you can hold onto information across contexts. –  maxpower Nov 20 '12 at 15:11
1  
maxpower, I believe you are mistaken. In my experience, transients never leave their MOC. This may not be strictly true in a parent/child MOC relationship. Judging by your experience, the child MOC can sometimes see the value of a transient in the parent MOC. As transients aren't saved, the parent should not ever see the value of a child's transient ivar. The proof though is in the code. This is relatively easy to test in a sample project simpler than the one you show. Andrew –  adonoho Nov 20 '12 at 22:58
    
adonoho, further research has revealed that you are correct. Transients do not reliably cross contexts and if you have multiple contexts in a non-parent/child setting, transients NEVER cross contexts. This should be clearly stated in Apple's docs. –  maxpower Nov 21 '12 at 3:30
    
maxpower, If you agree that I have answered your question, then please check the check. Andrew –  adonoho Nov 21 '12 at 14:21
    
I believe the answer it self is too far off the problem. Also, Scotts answer/comment that I raised answers more of the core of the problem relative to the structure of the question. Edit your answer and I might check it :) –  maxpower Nov 21 '12 at 16:26

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