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I have a struct, player, which is as follows:

struct player {
string name;
int rating;
};

I'd like to modify it such that I declare the struct with two arguments:

player(string, int)

it assigns the struct's contents with those values.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Although (as has been pointed out), you can simply add a constructor:

struct player() {
    string name;
    int rating;
    player(string Name, int Rating) { 
        name = Name; rating = Rating; 
    }
}; 

Is there some reason you don't want to make it a class?

class player() {
public:
    string name;
    int rating;
    player(string Name, int Rating) { 
        name = Name; rating = Rating; 
    }
}; 
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1  
Personally, I find having members default to private encourages good design. –  egrunin Nov 20 '12 at 5:53
    
I'm not sure if this is a valid reason, but I simply wanted something for data encapsulation; in this case, it's not important that anything remains private since it's ultimately a piece of a larger class. –  Michael Hang Nov 20 '12 at 6:03
    
My reason may not be persuasive, but it is valid. –  egrunin Nov 20 '12 at 6:04
1  
My apologies: I pressed the enter key prematurely- I didn't mean to question the validity of your statement. –  Michael Hang Nov 20 '12 at 6:05
    
Ah, understood. In any case your reasons for doing this are good: such a constructor makes the code more readable and less error-prone. –  egrunin Nov 20 '12 at 6:07

you would use the constructor, like so:

struct player {

  player(const string& pName, const int& pRating) :
    name(pName), rating(pRating) {} // << initialize your members
                                    //    in the initialization list

  string name;
  int rating;
};
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1  
+1 for having the only idiomatic constructor implementation. –  ildjarn Nov 20 '12 at 6:07
    
@ildjarn i +1'ed your answer for demonstrating the next best alternative :) –  justin Nov 20 '12 at 6:08

Aside from giving your type a constructor, because as-shown it is an aggregate type, you can simply use aggregate initialization:

player p = { "name", 42 };
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You are allowed to declare a constructor for your player struct:

struct player {
    string name;
    int rating;

    player(string n, int r) :
        name(n),
        rating(r)
    {
    }
};

In C++ one of the few differences between classes and structs is that class members default to private, while struct members default to public.

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1  
To nitpick, another difference is that default inheritance is public for structs and private for classes. –  jogojapan Nov 20 '12 at 5:48
1  
Why don't you use an initialization list in the constructor? –  jogojapan Nov 20 '12 at 5:49
1  
@jogojapan Good to note, thanks for nitpicking :). Regarding initialization list: also an option. Stylistic choice on my part I guess. Is there an advantage to doing so? –  ktodisco Nov 20 '12 at 5:50
1  
@ktodisco : One is initialization, the other is not (it's assignment). For semantic reasons this can be important (e.g. const/reference data members), and it's never worse with respect to performance. –  ildjarn Nov 20 '12 at 5:52
    
@ildjarn Ah, thanks. I had not considered the case of references. –  ktodisco Nov 20 '12 at 5:54

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