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I'm setting up a configuration file and system to process it. The current file I have is all JSON and is read using the GSON library. What I'd like to do is change part of the configuration file so I can chain rules to add more advanced logic.

For example, the configuration part would look similar to (assume it's JSON, but clearly it's not proper syntax):

Parts: {
    {
        {
            Type: Keyword,
            Keywords: "a,b,c",
            UniqueOnly: true,
            Threshold: 2,
        }

        AND

        {
            Type: RegEx,
            Pattern: "^(abc|123)$",
            UniqueOnly: true,
            Threshold: 2,
        }
    }
    OR
    {
        Type: Keyword,
        Keywords: "abc",
        Threshold: 1
    }
}

The inner parts will be able to translate back to a class appropriately but between the rules I'd like to have an option for "AND" as well as "OR" with nesting. Is this something that can be achieved with ease with any JSON/GSON parsers or is it more along the lines of needing to write an entirely custom reader from scratch?

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1 Answer 1

I would use valid JSON in this situation or would not use JSON at all. I have tried to do what you wnat and placed it on gist. The resulting JSON that is both serialized and deserialized looks like the following:

{
  "combOperation": "OR",
  "elements": [
    {
      "combOperation": "AND",
      "elements": [
        {
          "regex": "^[a-zA-Z]*",
          "uniqueOnly": false,
          "threshold": 1
        },
        {
          "keyWord": "BarFoo",
          "uniqueOnly": false,
          "threshold": 5
        }
      ]
    },
    {
      "keyWord": "FooBar",
      "uniqueOnly": true,
      "threshold": 2
    }
  ]
}
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