Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a script which should provide an option -h for help, when I try to write the help-message, I want to make it look more decent, like this:

print_help()
{
    printf "Usage: 
            ./prog -v version
                   -h help
                   -x ...."
}

And when I run the script, the help-message should be printed as I wrote it, like this:

Usage: 
./prog -v version
       -h help
       -x ....

In C, I can concatenate 2 strings in two lines like this:

printf("Usage:\n"
       "./prog -v version\n"
       "       -h help\n"
       "       -x ....\n");

these two lines will be concatenated together and then printed out.

I want to do pretty much the same thing in shell, and I tried printf and echo, seems cannot make it.

Any other advice?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I can think of 2 ways to do this

Method 1: Enclose the string you want to separate on multiple lines with single quotes instead of double quotes:

echo 'Usage: 
./prog -v version
       -h help
       -x ....'

Output:

Usage: 
./prog -v version
       -h help
       -x ....

Explanation:

Note that everything inside single quotes:

  • will not be expanded by bash (so you cannot use variables such as $var inside)
  • are interpreted literally by echo (including escaped chars, unless you use echo -e)

Method 2 - Updated for indented use inside a method: If you just have 1 long string that you'd like to break down into multiple lines in your code for better readability, you can use double quotes with the \ notation:

print_help() {
{
    echo \
    "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit,"\
    "sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna"\
    "aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation"\
    "ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat."\
    "Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit"
}

print_help

Output:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit

Explanation:

The \ character, when used as the very last character of a line in shell script, means line continuation (i.e. think of it as "hey! there's more stuff coming for this current command, don't execute it yet until you've read all of it!")


Personally, I prefer the 2nd route because you can use echo -e and escape chars (\n) for more fine-grained control over what exactly gets output =)

share|improve this answer
    
You could also use double quotes if something needs to be expanded, such as $0 or $(basename $0 .sh). –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 20 '12 at 6:44
    
I'd pick the second one. –  Alcott Nov 20 '12 at 9:03
    
But there is one more problem, in my print_help function, because of the indentation, those strings are not written at the beginning of each line, know what I mean? Then each line of the string will be prefixed with a tab, how could I remove it? –  Alcott Nov 20 '12 at 9:41
    
@Alcott (See updated method 2 regarding your comment) - For the string on each separate line, enclose them with double quotes, and the indentation should no longer be an issue. I double checked on my system =) –  sampson-chen Nov 20 '12 at 14:14

There is an ugly hack with cat (assuming your shell is /bin/sh):

cat <<EOS
./prog -v version
  -h help
  -x ....
EOS

It should be possible to do better ...

EDIT: use echo with '...' instead of cat, sorry for the misleading answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks anyway, :-) –  Alcott Nov 20 '12 at 9:03

Here are two additional methods;

Use echo -e to interpret \n newlines and join them using \ for line continuation

echo -e "Usage:\n" \
"./prog -v version\n" \
"       -h help\n" \
"       -x ...."

Use sed to print out help from an anonymous Here-Document

#!/bin/bash
:<<-PRINT_HELP_DOC
Usage: 
    ./prog -v version
        -h help
        -x ....
PRINT_HELP_DOC

print_help()
{
    # print lines 3 to 6
    sed -n '3,6p' "$0"
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.