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Setup is I have one Rails app setup to act as an JSON API and another static html page that I want to use to call the API. For sake of argument the rails API is at foo.com and the static html page is at bar.com.

On the foo.com app I have something like this:

    if !cookies[:foo]
      cookies[:foo] = "testing #{rand(500)}"
    else
      logger.info(cookies[:foo])

    render :json => { :cookie => cookies[:foo] }

When I try to do a ajax GET request with jquery from bar.com the cookie does not get sent back to the JSON API.

    $.get('http://foo.com/', function(data){console.log(data)})

But If I load the page a resource I can get the cookies to send back and forth between foo.com and bar.com

    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://foo.com"></script>

Does anyone know why I am able to pass cookies back and forth cross-domain when loading the script as a script resource and not when I do a simple ajax request? Any way around this?

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2 Answers 2

Use $.ajax as you need to make a JSONP request coz your ajax call is cross site.

$.ajax({
  url: "xxxx",
  crossDomain : true,
  dataType    : 'json',//if response is in JSON Notation
  success     : function (result){
   alert(result);
  }
});
share|improve this answer
    
I had tried that before however that didn't solve my problem. The cookie foo is still not getting sent in the request. On the rails side i added headers['Access-Control-Allow-Origin'] = '*' to allow for the request to come cross domain but cookie[:foo] still isn't sent with the request. –  ajorgensen Nov 20 '12 at 14:10
    
Do you have some console in your browser like firebug in Mozilla,You can monitor your requests from there. –  techie_28 Nov 21 '12 at 4:37

Just as techie said, you need to use $.ajax and make a json(p) request in order for cross domain to be enabled.

Cookies are tricky with this sort of implementation though. even if you manage to send your cookies back and forth using some sort of hack, older (or cheaper) browsers will block them.

*cough* IE *cough*

A simple way to "hack" around this is to pass the cookie in the url, like so:

$.ajax({
  url: "//domain.com/path/to/stuff;cookie1=value1?someParameter2=value2",
  crossDomain : true,
  dataType    : 'json',//if response is in JSON Notation
  success     : function (result){
   alert(result);
  }
});

In this example, I've told my server that my request has a cookie name "cookie1" with a value of "value1" and a GET parameter with a value of "value2"

Hope this helps.

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