Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a Computer Science Midterm tomorrow and I need help determining the complexity of these recursive functions. I know how to solve simple cases, but I am still trying to learn how to solve these harder cases. These were just a few of the example problems that I could not figure out. Any help would be much appreciated and would greatly help in my studies, Thank you!

 int recursiveFun1(int n)
    {
        if (n <= 0)
        return 1;
    else
        return 1 + recursiveFun1(n-1);
}

int recursiveFun2(int n)
{
    if (n <= 0)
        return 1;
    else
        return 1 + recursiveFun2(n-5);
}

int recursiveFun3(int n)
{
    if (n <= 0)
        return 1;
    else
        return 1 + recursiveFun3(n/5);
}

void recursiveFun4(int n, int m, int o)
{
    if (n <= 0)
    {
        printf("%d, %d\n",m, o);
    }
    else
    {
        recursiveFun4(n-1, m+1, o);
        recursiveFun4(n-1, m, o+1);
    }
}

int recursiveFun5(int n)
{
    for(i=0;i<n;i+=2)
        do something;

    if (n <= 0)
        return 1;
    else
        return 1 + recursiveFun5(n-5);
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

the first n times, for the function is being called recursively n times before reaching base case so its O(n). the second run n/5 for each time we deduct five from n before calling the function, but n/5 is also O(n). As for the third it log(n) base 5, for every time we divide by 5 before calling the function so its O(logn)(base 5). In the fourth, its 2^n since it like a tree each time calling the recursion twice. As for the last time the for loop takes n/2 sine we're increasing by 2, and the recursion take n/5 and since the for loop is called recursively therefore runtime is (n/5) *(n/2) = n^2/10 which O(n^2). Good luck on your midterms ;)

share|improve this answer
    
your right about the fifth, the n will decrease for the for loop but for the fourth I don't think its n^2 for its like a tree each time your calling the recursion twice so it should be 2^n plus that was your answer in the comment earlier. –  coder Nov 20 '12 at 7:19
    
Yes, the 4th one is 2^n, my deleted comment has a typo. But you should fix your post since it is saying log(2^n) –  nhahtdh Nov 20 '12 at 7:26
    
oh, seriously I didn't notice it, thank u, truly I wrote the log by mistake :$ –  coder Nov 20 '12 at 7:30

For the case where n <= 0, T(n) = O(1). Therefore, the time complexity will depend on when n >= 0.

We will consider the case n >= 0 in the part below.

1.

T(n) = a + T(n - 1)

where a is some constant.

By induction:

T(n) = n * a + T(0) = n * a + b = O(n)

where a, b are some constant.

2.

T(n) = a + T(n - 5)

where a is some constant

By induction:

T(n) = ceil(n / 5) * a + T(k) = ceil(n / 5) * a + b = O(n)

where a, b are some constant and k <= 0

3.

T(n) = a + T(n / 5)

where a is some constant

By induction:

T(n) = a * log5(n) + T(0) = a * log5(n) + b = O(log n)

where a, b are some constant

4.

T(n) = a + 2 * T(n - 1)

where a is some constant

By induction:

T(n) = a + 2a + 4a + ... + 2^n * a + T(0) * 2 ^ n 
     = a * 2^(n+1) - a + b * 2 ^ n
     = (2 * a + b) * 2 ^ n - a
     = O(2 ^ n)

where a, b are some constant.

5.

T(n) = n / 2 + T(n - 5)

We can prove by induction that T(5k) >= T(5k - d) where d = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4

Write n = 5m - b (m, b are integer; b = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4), then m = (n + b) / 5:

T(n) = T(5m - b) <= T(5m)

(Actually, to be more rigorous here, a new function T'(n) should be defined such that T'(5r - q) = T(5r) where q = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4. We know T(n) <= T'(n) as proven above. When we know that T'(n) is in O(f), which means there exist constant a, b so that T'(n) <= a * f(n) + b, we can derive that T(n) <= a * f(n) + b and hence T(n) is in O(f). This step is not really necessary, but it is easier to think when you don't have to deal with the remainder.)

Expanding T(5m):

T(5m) = 5m / 2 + T(5m - 5) 
      = (5m / 2 + 5 / 2) * m / 2 + T(0) 
      = O(m ^ 2) = O(n ^ 2)

Therefore, T(n) is O(n ^ 2).

share|improve this answer
    
I recently failed an interview question (and by extend the interview) that has to do with analyzing the time and space complexity of a recursive fibonacci function. This answer is epic and it helped a lot, I love it, I wish I could up vote you twice. I know it's old but do you have anything similar for calculating space - maybe a link, anything ? –  Dimitar Dimitrov Sep 3 '13 at 4:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.