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[<001360ac>] (unwind_backtrace+0x0/0xf8) from [<00147b7c>] (warn_slowpath_common+0x50/0x60)
[<00147b7c>] (warn_slowpath_common+0x50/0x60) from [<00147c40>] (warn_slowpath_null+0x1c/0x24)
[<00147c40>] (warn_slowpath_null+0x1c/0x24) from [<0014de44>] (local_bh_enable_ip+0xa0/0xac)
[<0014de44>] (local_bh_enable_ip+0xa0/0xac) from [<0019594c>] (bdi_register+0xec/0x150)
  • In unwind_backtrace+0x0/0xf8 what the +0x0/0xf8 stands for?
  • How can I see the C code of unwind_backtrace+0x0/0xf8
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2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

It's just an ordinary backtrace, those functions are called in reverse order (first one called was called by the previous one and so on):

unwind_backtrace+0x0/0xf8
warn_slowpath_common+0x50/0x60
warn_slowpath_null+0x1c/0x24
ocal_bh_enable_ip+0xa0/0xac
bdi_register+0xec/0x150

The bdi_register+0xec/0x150 is the symbol + the offset/length there's more information about that in Understanding a Kernel Oops and how you can debug a kernel oops. Also there's this excellent tutorial on Debugging the Kernel

Note: as suggested below by Eugene, you may want to try addr2line first, it still needs an image with debugging symbols though, for example

addr2line -e vmlinux_with_debug_info 0019594c(+offset)

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The question is how do you translate the offset?? what 0xec is and what 0x510 is? –  0x90 Nov 20 '12 at 8:06
1  
@0x90 updated... –  mux Nov 20 '12 at 8:15
    
@0x90 I don't think you can't get the exact line without debugging the kernel, because that's an instruction offset, the best you could do with oops dump is to know the function that crashed. –  mux Nov 20 '12 at 8:21
3  
Sometimes addr2line can resolve the address and determine the appropriate source lines. Of course, it is not always possible to map the instructions to the locations in the source code, but still, better than nothing. Debug symbols for the kernel are needed for that, of course. If one is lucky, they can be found either in vmlinux itself (for custom-built kernels) or in a separate package. Some distros provide such packages, the names may vary. addr2line -e vmlinux_with_debug_info 0019594c might help to find the source lines corresponding to bdi_register+0xec. –  Eugene Nov 21 '12 at 6:44
    
@Eugene thanks, I will add that to the answer –  mux Nov 21 '12 at 7:11

Here are 2 alternatives for addr2line I frequently use:

Using objdump:

  1. locate your vmlinux or the .ko file under the kernel root directory, afterwards dis-assembly the object file :

    objump -dS vmlinux > /tmp/kernel.s
    
  2. Open the generated assembly file, /tmp/kernel.s. with a text editor such as vim. Go to unwind_backtrace+0x0/0xf8, i.e. search for the address of unwind_backtrace + the offset. Finally, you have located the problematic part in your source code.

Using gdb:

IMO, a more elegant option is to use the one and only gdb. In case you have the suitable toolchain installed on your host machine:

  1. Run gdb <path-to-vmlinux>.
  2. Execute in gdb's prompt: list *(unwind_backtrace+0x10)

For additional information you may checkout the following:

  1. Kernel Debugging Tricks.
  2. Debugging The Linux Kernel Using Gdb
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