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I am new to Shell Script and I got a requirement to pick the latest files from a dir using Shell script

Directory Name : FTPDIR

File In this Dir will be of

APC5502015VP072020121826.csv
APC5502015VP082020122314.csv
APC5502015VP092020121451.csv
CBC5502015VP092020122045.csv
CBC5502015VP102020122045.csv
S5502015VP072020121620.csv
S5502015VP072020122314.csv
S5502015VP092020122045.csv

Note: (Need to Pick one Latest from each Group)- Below is the out put which I need to get after executing the shell script

APC5502015VP092020121451.csv
CBC5502015VP102020122045.csv
S5502015VP092020122045.csv

Ex: In the latest File APC5502015VP092020121451.csv the no 092020121451 is the date part in the format : MMDDYYYYHHMM and string part is APC5502015VP (Length Not Fixed in String Part)

I need to pick those three files from the dir using shell script

Can you help me to resolve this?

share|improve this question
    
What do you have so far? What have you tried? –  moregeek Nov 20 '12 at 7:49
4  
You'd make your life a lot easier if you used YYYYMMDD instead of MMDDYYYY in the file names! The people who designed ISO 8601 got that completely right. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 20 '12 at 7:51
    
Is the VP immediately before the date portion always that pair of characters (or do you have to count backwards from the . to find the end of the prefix? Do the file names ever contain spaces or other awkward characters? –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 20 '12 at 7:53
    
Cant say because in the above dir list it is VP Before Date portion But it can be of anything with anylength of string but format will ba as –  user1837933 Nov 20 '12 at 8:01

3 Answers 3

It's going to be really problematic to do this safely in just bash. As Jonathan mentioned, "special" characters like spaces or newlines may bung up your script.

If we can assume that there won't be any of those, then we can do most of job in bash, without involving other tools.

# Make an associative array to record types, in the second loop...
declare -A a

for file in *.csv; do
    # First, we convert the filenames into something that can be sorted.
    # The next three lines account for your "unknown length" in the first part
    # of the filename. We assume the date+time is the 12 chars before ".csv".
    new="$(rev <<<"$file")"
    new="${new:4:12}"
    new="$(rev <<<"$new")"
    new="${new:4:4}${new:0:2}${new:2:2}${new:8:4}"
    len=$(( ${#file} - 16 ))
    echo "$new ${file:0:$len} $file"
done | sort | while read date type file; do
    # Next, we print only the first of each "type"...
    if [[ ${a[$type]} -eq 0 ]]; then
        a[$type]=1
        echo "$file"
    fi
    # And stop once we have collected three types.
    if [[ ${#a[*]} -ge 3 ]]; then
        break
    fi
done

As I say, this doesn't handle newlines in filenames.

Note also that this uses rev and sort, which are not built in to bash. The rev parts could be done internally, using more code, which might make them execute faster, but you'd only see a difference in very extreme cases. There's not much we can do about sort, since there isn't a built-in within bash.

share|improve this answer
    
Why are you selecting only the first 3 characters for each group? Isn't the group the whole string to the left of the date? –  Graham Nov 22 '12 at 17:17
1  
@Graham - hmm, good point; the OP didn't really define what he meant by "Group", so I guess I just made it up. Upon re-reading, it seems as if it should be the whole left-hand-side, before the date, as you suggest. I've updated my answer; note the addition of $len. –  ghoti Nov 22 '12 at 21:30

This Perl script works on the given data. No doubt it could be improved.

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my %bases;

while (<>)
{
    chomp;
    my $name = $_;
    my($prefix, $mmdd, $yyyy, $hhmm) = ($name =~ m/(.*)(\d{4})(\d{4})(\d{4})\.csv/);
    #print "$name = $prefix $yyyy $mmdd $hhmm\n";
    my $stamp = "$yyyy$mmdd$hhmm";
    if (!exists($bases{$prefix}) || ($stamp > $bases{$prefix}->{stamp}))
    {
        $bases{$prefix} = { name => $name, stamp => $stamp };
    }
}

foreach my $prefix (sort keys %bases)
{
    print "$bases{$prefix}->{name}\n";
}

Output:

APC5502015VP092020121451.csv
CBC5502015VP102020122045.csv
S5502015VP092020122045.csv
share|improve this answer

this is the awk solution:

cd FTPDIR
ls -1|awk -F"VP" '{split($2,a,".");if(a[1]>b[$1]){b[$1]=$2}}END{for(i in b)print i"VP"b[i]}'

Testted Below:

> cat temp
APC5502015VP072020121826.csv
APC5502015VP082020122314.csv
APC5502015VP092020121451.csv
CBC5502015VP092020122045.csv
CBC5502015VP102020122045.csv
S5502015VP072020121620.csv
S5502015VP072020122314.csv
S5502015VP092020122045.csv
> awk -F"VP" '{split($2,a,".");if(a[1]>b[$1]){b[$1]=$2}}END{for(i in b)print i"VP"b[i]}' temp
CBC5502015VP102020122045.csv
S5502015VP092020122045.csv
APC5502015VP092020121451.csv
share|improve this answer
    
While this works for the input sample shown, parsing LS is generally bad practice. –  ghoti Nov 21 '12 at 23:33
    
I think this solution fails to show only the first item of each "type". –  Graham Nov 22 '12 at 17:16

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