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Does the client need to install a certificate, when using username athentication on a wsHttpBinding with WCF, or is this only needed on the host? And in any case, does this certificate need to be signed by a third party or will it also work with a self signed one?

My understanding is that i can use a selfSigned certificate and set

<authentication certificateValidationMode="None" /> 

on the server side. Is this correct?

And one more thing. Do i need to put the cert in any specific store, if i use a self signed cert, or is that all the same? - Answer to self: The store is of no importance as long as the right store is set in code.

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As much as I know, with username authentication mode, you use SSL certification for more security and it is arbitrary. –  persian Developer Nov 20 '12 at 7:45
    
using security mode "message" and clientcredentialtype "userName", my understanding is that a certificate is needed. ANn i think i need an aditional cert to use SSL on the transportation. –  espvar Nov 20 '12 at 7:48
    
A certificate is indeed needed. The logic is why pass credentials in 'clear' text non-SSL. –  lcryder Nov 20 '12 at 11:57
    
@lcryder I know that it is needed on the host for message, but do the consumer of the server need to install the cert on the clientside? Or is the public key sufficient? –  espvar Nov 21 '12 at 9:47
    
SSL always requires a cert. If possible have your customer hit your service with a browser from the system they will be posting from. The cert can be installed using the browser. If on a windows system install the cert in the 'Third Party...' store. –  lcryder Nov 21 '12 at 11:32

1 Answer 1

WCF will not permit username authentication without transport mode security which means that you need a certificate.

There two ways, as far as I known, to get a proper certificate:

  1. Purchase one from a trusted Certificate Authority.
  2. Become a Certificate Authority yourself and create certificates. This is not very usuful unless you control both side of the conversation. If you decide to make you own certificates you can use MakeCert and Pvk2Pfx or OpenSSL to create chained encrypted certificates. Have a look at this how-to article that uses OpenSSL. Last but not least note that you should keep the private key at a secure location.

Now you should have the following files (the names are for demonstrative purposes):

  • server.cer (public key for the server)
  • server.pfx (key exchange file for the server)
  • client.cer (public key for the client)
  • client.pfx (key exchange file for the client)

Then you can do the following:

  • On the server, in the local computer certificate store:

    1. Import server.pfx to the Personal folder. This will allow the server to encrypt messages with its private key and to decrypt message that have been encrypted with its public key.
    2. Import client.cer to the Trusted People folder. This will allow the server to encrypt message with the client's public key and decrypt messages that have been encrypted with the client's private key.
  • On the client, in the local computer certificate store:

    1. Import client.pfx to the Personal folder. This will allow the client to encrypt messages with its private key and to decrypt message that have been encrypted with its public key.
    2. Import server.cer to the Trusted People folder. This will allow the client to encrypt message with the server's public key and decrypt messages that have been encrypted with the server's private key.

Finally on the configuration file of both client and service set:

<authentication certificateValidationMode="ChainTrust"/> 

which will ensure that only certificates that can chain up to a certificate authority in the Trusted Root Store will be valid.

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