Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have created a WCF service, basically it does some interaction with my database. The service is in a project, and it calls functions from a library that i created in another project. In my library, which i will call WCFSerivceLibrary i also have an app.config which i want to pull out some stored values in the AppSettings section.

The issue is that when i call my WCF service from a certain client, and a function is executing in the WCFServiceLibrary, whenever i call AppSettings it checks the configuration file for the calling client!

Further Explanation : lets say we have a windows forms application which calls my WCF service this way :

MyWCFService.DoWork();

in the function DoWork in my WCF service i have the following code :

Type DoWork ()
{
  //MyWCFServiceLibrary is a library in the same solution of the WCF Service.
  MyWCFServiceLibrary.DoWorkOne(); 
  MyWCFServiceLibrary.DoWorkTwo();
}

In the functions DoWorkOne or DoWorkTwo... I'm calling on AppSettings to get some values stored in the app.config of MyWCFServiceLibrary project, but instead, on execution the AppSettings are loaded from the app.cofing of my windows forms client calling the WCF service.

  1. How to avoid the mentioned issue above?
  2. Can I have a single configuration file for my WCF Service and the service library?
  3. How to share it between both?
share|improve this question
    
You can't have an app.config file in a library project -- it will get ignored. –  McGarnagle Nov 20 '12 at 8:48
    
You need to copy the settings from the library's app.config to the app.config of the program that uses the library. Then, the configuration mechanisms work as expected. –  Thorsten Dittmar Nov 20 '12 at 8:55
    
"The issue is that when i call my WCF service from a certain client, and a function is executing in the WCFServiceLibrary, whenever i call AppSettings it checks the configuration file for the calling client!" - please show what you mean by this, preferably with code. –  CodeCaster Nov 20 '12 at 9:05
    
To me it sounds like the op wants to expose the server-side app.config to the client-side .... –  m0sa Nov 20 '12 at 9:14
    
@CodeCaster check my edit please –  Siraj Mansour Nov 20 '12 at 9:27
show 2 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm writing below what I meant about copying the configuration. But I don't think that this is the problem. The problem is probably that you're not even doing WCF communication. I suspect that you included the DLL both in the service project and the client project and you're simple calling the methods on class from the client.

Do do WCF communication you need to have the WCF service running (for example an EXE that creates a ServiceHost with an endpoint). Then in the client, you add a service reference by using Visual Studio's "Add service reference" menu item.

There's no need to include the DLL in the client, as classes will be generated automatically to access the service via WCF.

Now for using application settings properly:

Copy the application settings of your DLL's app.config file to the app.config file of the executable project that's using the DLL. For example, this could then look like this:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<configuration>
    <configSections>
        <sectionGroup name="applicationSettings" type="System.Configuration.ApplicationSettingsGroup, System, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089" >
            <section name="Executable.Properties.Settings" type="System.Configuration.ClientSettingsSection, System, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089" requirePermission="false" />
            <section name="DLL.Properties.Settings" type="System.Configuration.ClientSettingsSection, System, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089" requirePermission="false" />        
        </sectionGroup>
    </configSections>

  <applicationSettings>
      <Executable.Properties.Settings>
          <setting name="Test" serializeAs="String">
              <value>Testvalue EXE</value>
          </setting>
      </Executable.Properties.Settings>
      <DLL.Properties.Settings>
          <setting name="Test" serializeAs="String">
              <value>Testvalue DLL</value>
          </setting>
      </DLL.Properties.Settings>
    </applicationSettings>
</configuration>

After doing that, the application can access its settings through Properties.Settings.Default.Test (which returns Testvalue EXE) and the DLL can access its settings through Properties.Settings.Default.Test (which returns Testvalue DLL).

I don't understand why people need to use things like ConfigurationManager when it is actually that simple...

share|improve this answer
    
your assumption presumes that i am dumb .. actually i am not .. i clearly stated that i am calling the WCF service which is being hosted in a windows service, and yes i do have a service reference to the WCF in my client project. –  Siraj Mansour Nov 20 '12 at 9:55
2  
I did not mean to imply that you're dumb and I don't think you are, as we all sometimes make the darndest mistakes no matter how experienced we are. However, the only possible solution for the client configuration to be accessed is that the class accessing the configuration is running as part of the client. –  Thorsten Dittmar Nov 20 '12 at 10:55
    
But my problem is totally the opposite, the client configuration is being accessed when actually the intended configuration is the configuration file in the library project that the WCF service calls. –  Siraj Mansour Nov 20 '12 at 11:00
    
Library projects can have configuration files when you add settings in Visual Studio for the library project. But the library will not read the file when being used by a running program. That leads to the often quoted "DLL projects can't have configuration files". The only way is to copy the configuration as I described above. Still the fact remains: As the client configuration is not transferred to the server via WCF, the only way that values from the client configuration are used is that you're not making a WCF call. –  Thorsten Dittmar Nov 20 '12 at 11:20
1  
The library is used by the executable that hosts the WCF service, right? In that case, you'd have to copy the library's configuration into the executables app.config as I described above. However, if both the service and the library need the same setting, you'd have to have it once in the service executable's settings section and once in the library's settings section. –  Thorsten Dittmar Nov 20 '12 at 13:26
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.