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I have a problem with return a value from an object. my object looks like this.

   function XYZ(date, startT)
     {
     var _date=date;
     var _startT=startT;
     this.get_date = function() {
       return _date;
       };
      this.set_date = function(value) {
        _date=value;
      };
       this.get_startT = function() {
       return _startT;
       };
       this.set_startT = function(value) {
       _startT=value;
      };
      this.toString()
      return (_date + " " _startT);
      }

then i create an Array like this

   jsData[0] =new XYZ("2012-11-11","8:00");
   jsData[1] = new XYZ("2012-03-03","8:00");

when i want to use get_date method it didn't return me the value but the get_startT method works fine. When i show object with .toString method it also show me full object

Please help.

share|improve this question
    
I would suggest avoiding underscores in variable names. Concatenate names like this instead: longVariableName. –  Cerbrus Nov 20 '12 at 9:37
2  
That code has a series of syntax errors, as your JavaScript engine should be showing you (in the console, on browser). Missing {, expressions started but never completed. The this.toString() would be a no-op if it had a semicolon after it (without the semicolon it causes a syntax error because of what follows it). Returning a string primitive out of a constructor function is another no-op. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 20 '12 at 9:39
    
i had {} in my code i was just missing () when i called this method alert(jsData[2].get_date(); –  bohunn Nov 20 '12 at 9:48
    
When you say "when I show object with .toString method" - if you define .toString as a method (see my answer below) it should work. Also make sure you actually call "jsData[0].toString()" - if you just refer to "jsData.toString" you'll see the function itself, not its result. –  Jed Watson Nov 20 '12 at 10:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It works if you fix all the syntax errors:

function XYZ(date, startT) {
  var _date=date;
  var _startT=startT;
  this.get_date = function() {
    return _date;
  };
  this.set_date = function(value) {
    _date=value;
  };
  this.get_startT = function() {
    return _startT;
  };
  this.set_startT = function(value) {
    _startT=value;
  };
}

var jsData = [];
jsData[0] = new XYZ("2012-11-11","8:00");
jsData[1] = new XYZ("2012-03-03","8:00");

display("jsData[0].get_date() = " + jsData[0].get_date());

Output:

jsData[0].get_date() = 2012-11-11

Live Copy | Source

Other than obvious typos, here's what I did:

  • Put { and } around the function body.

  • Removed the this.toString() which was non-functional (a no-op, as you didn't store the result anywhere).

  • Removed the return at the end, because returning a string primitive out of a constructor function is another no-op.

  • Declared jsData.

  • Initialized jsData.

share|improve this answer

You appear to be missing a opening bracket { after

function XYZ(date, startT)

And one at the end of your code. (})

share|improve this answer
    
sorry, i was just typing fast and forgot..but that's not the point of whole story –  bohunn Nov 20 '12 at 9:43
4  
@PawełBoruń: When posting code asking people to spend their time helping you, take the time to check that you've posted correct code. (Or better yet, use copy-and-paste -- because you do try to simplify things and run the simplified version before you post, right?) –  T.J. Crowder Nov 20 '12 at 9:47
    
It was a part of the problem, however. –  Cerbrus Nov 20 '12 at 9:47
    
@T.J.Crowder mea culpa...i didn't want to copy so many lines, just the main source of problem. Thank for help :) –  bohunn Nov 20 '12 at 9:50
1  
@PawełBoruń: Right, so you create a minimal, correct example, try it, and if it still has the issue you post the question with that minimal, correct example. Blindly posting half-edited code is a waste of everyone's time. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 20 '12 at 9:55

Try adding methods to the function prototype like this:

function XYZ(date, startT) {
  this._date = date;
  this._startT = startT;
}

XYZ.prototype.get_date = function() {
  return this._date;
}
XYZ.prototype.set_date = function(value) {
  this._date = value;
}
XYZ.prototype.get_startT = function() {
  return this._startT;
}
XYZ.prototype.set_startT = function(value) {
  this._startT = value;
}
XYZ.prototype.toString = function() {
  return this._date + " " + this._startT;
}

var myXYZ = new XYZ("2012-11-11","8:00");
myXYZ.toString(); // "2012-11-11 8:00"

I tested that in the console and it outputs the final string correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
I would suggest against using it this way. You generally want your (pseudo-)class's functions to be defined within the class itself. –  Cerbrus Nov 20 '12 at 9:51
    
You're fundamentally changing his code (making the properties public), not explaining why what he posted isn't working. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 20 '12 at 9:56
    
Fair enough. In defence of my method, I believe inheriting prototype methods will perform better, but that's probably not an issue here (nor part of the question). I guessed (despite the broken syntax in the example given) that toString was meant to be a method definition, rather than a return from the constructor. –  Jed Watson Nov 20 '12 at 10:03
    
"I believe inheriting prototype methods will perform better" What makes you think that? Each call to them will require extra overhead, because for myXYZ.get_date(), the engine first has to do a lookup on the myXYZ object to see if it has a get_date property, and then seeing that it doesn't, repeat the lookup on its prototype. In contrast, if the function is assigned directly to the instance (as in the OP's code), the lookup doesn't have to be repeated. (continued) –  T.J. Crowder Nov 20 '12 at 11:51
    
(continuing) Now, if there are thousands of these XYZ objects, the fact that thousands of function objects are being created (because new functions have to be created to be assigned to the instances) could be an issue. But note that it's only the function objects that have to be recreated, a modern engine can reuse the underlying code (just with a different bound execution context). –  T.J. Crowder Nov 20 '12 at 11:52

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