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.NET Framework 3.5

I have two threads that using the same generic collection. One thread loop through the collection using the foreach statement:

while(HaveToContinue)
{
   // Do work 1

   try
   {
      foreach(var item in myDictionary)
      {
         // Do something with/to item
      }

      // Do work 2 (I need to complete the foreach first)
   }
   catch(InvalidOperationException)
   {
   }
}

At the same time the other thread modify the collection:

// The following line causes the InvalidOperationException (in the foreach)
myDictionary.Remove(...);

So, is there a way to avoid this InvalidOperationException? If I could avoid this exception I could complete my work (work 1 + work 2) all times, instead, every time I catch the exception, I can't finish the work.

I thought to use a ManualResetEvent object, something like this:

while(HaveToContinue)
{
   // Do work 1

   try
   {
      myResetEvent.Reset();
      foreach(var item in myDictionary)
      {
         // Do something with/to item
      }
      myResetEvent.Set();

      // Do work 2 (I need to complete the foreach first)
   }
   catch(InvalidOperationException)
   {
   }
}

And every time the other thread modify the collection:

// Expect the foreach is completed
myResetEvent.WaitOne();
// And then modify the collection
myDictionary.Remove(...);

But probably there is a better solution.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you're using .NET 4, you should use the ConcurrentBag or ConcurrentDictionary class instead, which are thread-safe.

If you're using an earlier version, then the easiest (albeit inefficient) solution would be to use a lock. You could instantiate this as a plain object:

private readonly object sync = new object();

Then, when you need to access the list, acquire the lock first:

while (HaveToContinue)
{
   // Do work 1

   lock (sync)
   {
      foreach (var item in myDictionary)
      {
         // Do something with/to item
      }
   }

   // Do work 2 (I need to complete the foreach first)
}

Similarly when modifying the collection, acquiring the same lock:

lock (sync)
{
    myDictionary.Remove(...);
}

If the amount of work you have to do on each item is substantial, then it would be more efficient to first obtain a local copy of the dictionary, release the lock, and then proceed to iterate over the said copy, allowing the racing thread to modify the global dictionary:

while (HaveToContinue)
{
   // Do work 1

   Dictionary<Key,Value> localDictionary;

   lock (sync)
   {
      localDictionary = new Dictionary<Key,Value>(myDictionary);
   }

   foreach (var item in localDictionary)
   {
      // Do something with/to item
   }

   // Do work 2 (I need to complete the foreach first)
}
share|improve this answer
    
If this is the inefficient solution there is also an efficient one? –  Nick Nov 20 '12 at 10:04
    
Using the new dictionary if I change the item the change is not reflected on the original collection. –  Nick Nov 20 '12 at 10:08
    
If the dictionary's values are of a reference type, then yes, changes would be reflected to the original collection, since both local and original collections would contain references to the same objects. –  Douglas Nov 20 '12 at 10:09
    
In fact, if they are reference type... This is the problem: I can't ensure this. Anyway +1 for now, I'll test your solution. –  Nick Nov 20 '12 at 10:12
    
If they are not, it typically isn't an issue either, since value types are generally immutable. –  Douglas Nov 20 '12 at 10:14

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