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I have a requirement to check a log file till a PID is alive in perl. It is working fine in bash.

tail -f --pid=1234 logfile.log

Now I need the same to do with perl to check a log file either by checking the PID or giving the time interval also works for me.

I am using the following code to do it in perl, but I am able to tail a file and have two issues in it.

1) Tail of a file is not happening immediatly.

2) I want to close the tail after few seconds, say 100.

use warnings;
use strict;
use File::Tail; 
my $name='/tmp/out'; 
my $file=File::Tail->new(name=>$name,interval=>1,maxinterval=>5,adjustafter=>1);
my ($found,$timeleft,@pending) = File::Tail::select(undef,undef,undef,100,$file);

if ($found)
{
   print $pending[0]->read;
}

I am using the above code and it is exiting in only 2 seconds. I am looking for to tail a file like exactly tailf command in linux to exit after the time given.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
2  
What have you tried so far? What is the problem you've encountered? What is your actual question? We're not a "write my code for me plz" site. –  Moritz Bunkus Nov 20 '12 at 10:06
    
I am using the following code to do it in perl, but I am able to tail a file and have two issues in it. 1) Tail of a file is not happening immediatly. 2) I want to close the tail after few seconds, say 100. use File::Tail; $name='/tmp/out'; $file=File::Tail->new(name=>$name, interval=>1, adjustafter=>1); while (defined($line=$file->read)) { print "$line"; } –  Sriharsha Kalluru Nov 20 '12 at 10:21
3  
Please edit your original question and put that code in there. Always keep your question up to date with new information you have about the problem. –  Moritz Bunkus Nov 20 '12 at 10:37

1 Answer 1

From the documentation:

The module tries very hard NOT to "busy-wait" on a file that has little traffic. Any time it reads new data from the file, it counts the number of new lines, and divides that number by the time that passed since data were last written to the file before that. That is considered the average time before new data will be written. When there is no new data to read, File::Tail sleeps for that number of seconds. Thereafter, the waiting time is recomputed dynamicaly. Note that File::Tail never sleeps for more than the number of seconds set by maxinterval.

So you need to set maxinterval to a low number if you want it to see updates immediately.

Update: to timeout, use select. This simple example does a single, 100-second check on the file. It also checks the file at least every five seconds. For a more complex example using a loop, see the aforementioned documentation.

use warnings;
use strict;
use File::Tail; 
my $name='/tmp/out'; 
my $file=File::Tail->new(name=>$name,interval=>1,maxinterval=>5,adjustafter=>1);
my ($found,$timeleft,@pending) = File::Tail::select(undef,undef,undef,100,$file);

if ($found)
{
   print $pending[0]->read;
}

Update: here is a looping solution that will keep going for your entire time interval:

use warnings;
use strict;
use File::Tail; 
my $name='/tmp/out'; 
my $file=File::Tail->new(name=>$name,interval=>1,maxinterval=>5,adjustafter=>1);

my $time = 60;

while ($time > 0)
{
    my ($found,@pending);
    ($found,$time,@pending) = File::Tail::select(undef,undef,undef,$time,$file);

    if ($found)
    {
        print $_->read for @pending;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It is running fine but, If I want to tail a file for 60 sec, then what are the parameters need to change in the above code. –  Sriharsha Kalluru Nov 20 '12 at 11:59
    
@harsha, the 100 in the select call above is the maximum amount of time it will wait in seconds, so just change that to 60. If you need to keep waiting for the full 60 seconds, even if you detect a change, you will need to also add looping logic. Let me know if that is the case. –  dan1111 Nov 20 '12 at 12:11
    
It is displaying the content for only 2 to 3 seconds and exiting. But actually I am looking for tail that particular file like tailf command in linux. –  Sriharsha Kalluru Nov 21 '12 at 3:18
    
@harsha, the reason for that is it returns as soon as it detects a change to the file. I thought that might be what you want, since you were waiting "till a PID is alive." See the update for an example that will keep waiting for the entire time period you specify. –  dan1111 Nov 21 '12 at 8:45
    
Still it is happening in the same way and exiting in 2 to 3 seconds. My exact requirement is to tail a file for the given seconds by me. As it is not possible in Linux I am using pid options with tail command. –  Sriharsha Kalluru Nov 21 '12 at 12:22

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