Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How is it possible to traverse through any given sentence word by word? Is there any in-built functions in java? I have no idea how to begin.

share|improve this question
    
What are the characteristics of words? They are seperated by blanks.. –  Hasslarn Nov 20 '12 at 10:24
    
I would try Scanner. I would begin by writing a main() to reading in a line of text and break it into words. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 20 '12 at 10:25
    
Can you post a sample sentence? How long it is? What all delimiters it is using between words? –  Rohit Jain Nov 20 '12 at 10:25
1  
@Hasslam At a very basic level you are somewhat correct however you must remember there are times where special characters will be used, most commonly, commas, periods, semi-colons, quotation marks, question marks, exclamation marks. The list goes on. My point is, even once you split a sentence by spaces there is a lot more to be done before you are left with words. –  Jon Taylor Nov 20 '12 at 10:27
    
Remember also that a single space is not always what splits a word. In many languages, such as English (although not all languages), a period is followed by two spaces. Be sure to split on one or more spaces so you remove all the white space, or trim once you split. –  Jon Taylor Nov 20 '12 at 10:36

11 Answers 11

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Something like this:

String sentence = "Your sentence here.";
String[] words = sentence.split("\\s+"); // splits by whitespace
for (String word : words) {
    System.out.println(word);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
What if words have a , in between them? –  Rohit Jain Nov 20 '12 at 10:27
1  
OP didn't specify requirements for words, also he can start with that and learn to do the rest instead of copying our code. No offense, I am a big fan of your answers here, and give you a lot of +1s ;) –  jlordo Nov 20 '12 at 10:31
    
Well, No offense taken. Really. I just added that, so that you can add it to your answer. Since, a sentence of course can have many delimiters between words. But you are right, that OP has not specified that clearly. Else it is perfectly fine :) –  Rohit Jain Nov 20 '12 at 10:34
    
@jlordo.. And thanks for that appreciation. Really I'm glad that my answers help people out there. :) :D –  Rohit Jain Nov 20 '12 at 10:35
    
-1 splitting on just whitespaces too simplistic. See my answer for the simple, straightforward way to successfully split the vast majority of sentences. –  Bohemian Nov 20 '12 at 10:56
String[] array = input.split(" ");

That way the string is converted into an array separated by spaces (you can change the separator in the split()'s argumen) and then you can loop through the array as you want.

share|improve this answer

Start with StringTokenizer for example or use String.split(" ")

share|improve this answer
1  
Mention: StringTokenizer is considered legacy class and is not recommended now according to its javadoc. –  jabal Nov 20 '12 at 10:27

Try splitting the sentence by whitespace character.

String sentence = "This is a sentence.";

for(String word: sentence.split("\\s+"){
  System.out.println(word);
}
share|improve this answer
    
What if words have a , in between them? –  Rohit Jain Nov 20 '12 at 10:26
String s="sfgasdfg  jhsadfkjashfd sajdfhjkasdfh hjskafhasj";
String wordArray[] =s.split("\\s+");
for(String sT :wordArray)
{
System.out.println(st);
}
share|improve this answer

Take a look at the String Split function here http://www.tek-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=1167964

share|improve this answer

Assuming you already have the sentence stored as a string, you could use the String.replaceAll("[./,]"," ") method to remove the stop words and then use the String.split("\\s+") to obtain the individual words making up the phrase.

share|improve this answer
    
Or we can have all those stop words added to the Regex passed in split method. String.split("[ ,.:]"); –  Rohit Jain Nov 20 '12 at 10:28
    
@RohitJain: Indeed, but punctuation marks are usually removed and not considered as words –  npinti Nov 20 '12 at 10:31
    
@npinti.. No. I mean, you don't need to replace your stop words. You can split on all of them, as split takes a Regex. –  Rohit Jain Nov 20 '12 at 10:32
    
@RohitJain: Now I get what you mean. Yes in that case I agree with you :). –  npinti Nov 20 '12 at 10:45

I would Say StringTokenizer might help You.

        String str = "This is String , split by StringTokenizer, created by mkyong";
        StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer(str);

        System.out.println("---- Split by space ------");
        while (st.hasMoreElements()) {
            System.out.println(st.nextElement());
        }

        System.out.println("---- Split by comma ',' ------");
        StringTokenizer st2 = new StringTokenizer(str, ",");

        while (st2.hasMoreElements()) {
            System.out.println(st2.nextElement());
        }

Also String.split() may help You:

     String[] result = "this is a test".split("\\s");
     for (int x=0; x<result.length; x++)
         System.out.println(result[x]);

OUTPUT:

this
 is
 a
 test
share|improve this answer

A lot of people are suggesting to split on spaces, but even this very sentence contains commas, etc. You should split on more than just spaces; split on punctuation characters too:

String words = sentence.split("([\\s.,;:\"?!,.…(){}[\\]%#/]|(- )|( -))+");

This regex splits on all reasonably expected punctuation characters. Note that the in-word hyphen and the apostrophe are not "punctuation"; they are part of the word.

This approach, or something similar, will also handle non-English character sentences.

share|improve this answer
    
this is worse than splitting on whitespace (which is only an introductory example), because it splits within words that contain non-ascii letters and looses them. This is especially important when dealing with non-english text. –  jlordo Nov 20 '12 at 11:54
    
@jlordo good point - that was rather Anglo-centric of me. I've edited my answer to accommodate all languages. –  Bohemian Nov 20 '12 at 16:48
    
was going to say replace most of it with \\p{Punct} but than I saw how you nicely handled the hyphen :) –  jlordo Nov 20 '12 at 17:19
    
@jlordo Regarding the hyphen, I thought of an edge case of "like these:- blah blah" where the hyphen is punctuation, but has an adjacent non-space char, so I couldn't simply use " - " as the non-match, hence the two separate cases of adjacent spaces either side. –  Bohemian Nov 20 '12 at 21:53

you can use StringTokenizer class which will divide the string into words.

      public static void main(String ae[]){
    String st = "This is Java";
    StringTokenizer str= new StringTokenizer(st);
    while(str.hasMoreTokens()){
        System.out.println(str.nextToken());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
System.out.println(Arrays.toString(
    "Many words//separated.by-different\tcharacters"
        .split("\\W+")));
//[Many, words, separated, by, different, characters]
share|improve this answer
    
Look at what it will do to "Pete's résumé is good." –  jlordo Nov 20 '12 at 12:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.