Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I can't get bottom-padding to work when I use overflow-y: auto on a box.

HTML:

<div id="container">
    <div id="some_info"></div>
</div>

CSS:

#container {
    padding: 3em;
    overflow-x: hidden;
    overflow-y: auto;
    width: 300px;
    height: 300px;
    background: red;
}

#some_info {
    height: 900px;
    background: #000;
}

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/rwgZu/

EDIT: I use Firefox

share|improve this question
    
I see even padding (red) around all edges. – Grant Thomas Nov 20 '12 at 11:09
3  
AHa, maybe it's just Firefox? – Philip Nov 20 '12 at 11:12
    
This is working as you've told it to. Did you expect a different result? – Kyle Nov 20 '12 at 11:12
    
@KyleSevenoaks - See edit q, I use Firefox,.. – Philip Nov 20 '12 at 11:13
1  
I confirm the problem in FF17 – Alexandre Lavoie Nov 20 '12 at 11:13
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is a possible approach that is working perfectly :

#container {
    overflow-x: hidden;
    overflow-y: auto;
    width: 300px;
    height: 300px;
}

#some_info {
    height: 900px;
    background: #000;
    border: 3em solid red;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, Yeah, that's a solution, but let's say that #some_info is dynamic information and not always tagged as #some_info... – Philip Nov 20 '12 at 11:15
    
It depends on the content of course, you can also keep an inner div. – Alexandre Lavoie Nov 20 '12 at 11:17
    
I guess, this is a solution that works, even though I don't really like to add extra divs :) – Philip Nov 20 '12 at 11:19
    
As I say sometimes, cross-browser html/css is an art! :) Hope to see some websites that work also in IE6 in museum, they are piece of art! – Alexandre Lavoie Nov 20 '12 at 11:22
1  
@AlexandreLavoie why border: 3em; instead margin: 3em;? The result is the same, but the reference to border keyword can create unnecessary confusion to other developers – T-moty Dec 31 '14 at 10:53

One more solution without extra DIVs.

#container:after {
  content: "";
  display: block;
  height: 50px;
  width: 100%;
}

Working in FF, Chrome, IE8-10.

share|improve this answer
    
Outstanding solution, extremely flexible. You don't even need a container, just a single <div>. This should be the accepted answer. – Cthulhu Jan 22 at 11:37

Demo

Hi now used to this css

#container {
    padding: 3em;
    overflow-x: hidden;
    overflow-y: auto;
    width: 300px;
    height: 300px;
    background: red;
    padding-bottom:0; // add this line in your css
}

#some_info {
    height: 900px;
    background: #000;
    margin-bottom:3em; // add this line in your css
}

Demo

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that also works, thanks! – Philip Nov 20 '12 at 11:23
    
This works because there's no content. When you add content, it overlaps everything in there, even the padding! Any border, margin or other even container without content is collapsed inside the scrolling div (at least in chrome 43) – sergio Jul 4 '15 at 20:45

It's not only with bottom padding. Right padding/border/spacing is also ignored (you can't see it in your example because it has no content, and the width is not scrolling)

All the answers above fail in chrome 43, generating up to 3 scrollbars! or if the content overflows #some_info.

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/LwujL3ad/

If it worked for you, it's probably because the content was not as wide as the scrolling element, or fixed sized.

The right solution is:

Set #some info to display:table, and add padding or border to it, not to the scrolling container.

#container {
    overflow: scroll;
    width: 300px;
    height: 300px;
    background: red;
    padding-bottom:0;
}

    #some_info {
    display:table;
    border: solid 3em red;
    height: 900px;
    background: #000;
    margin-bottom:3em;
    color: white;
}

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/juh7802x/

The only element that doesn't fail, and respects ANY border and padding you add in there as separator is a TABLE.

I tried, and no matter if it's the next direct child or it's nested many items deep, any non-content styling will NOT expand to wrap the content, and will stay 100% width of the parent. Which is nonsense, because having content BIGGER than the parent is EXACTLY the scenario in which a scrolling div is required!

For a dynamic solution (both the container and the content) set the container of the elements inside the scrolling container to display:table.

share|improve this answer

I'm late to the party, but I thought it was worth adding a different solution that addresses some of the concerns raised above.

I came here because of exactly the kind of situation that @Philip raised in response to Alexandre Lavoie's solution: I have dynamically generated content inside the container, so I can't just apply styling to a specific div name like #some_info.

Happily, there's a simple solution for browsers that support CSS3: instead of applying bottom padding to the container, apply a bottom margin to the last child element inside the container.

#container > :last-child {
    margin-bottom: 3em;
}

As long as the last child element in the container div is a block-level element, this should do the trick.

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/rwgZu/240/

P.S. If Firefox's failure to scroll to the bottom of the padding is indeed a bug (as suggested by @Kyle), it still hasn't been fixed as of Firefox 47.0. Frustrating! Internet Explorer 11.0.9600.17843 exhibits the same behavior. (Google Chrome, in contrast, shows the bottom padding as expected.)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.