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EDIT: I need to do this in ACCESS.

I am an SQL virgin and would greatly appreciate any magical assistance!

For a simple 12 month forecast, I am utilizing a 12 month Double Moving Average. I have managed to pull the Single Moving Average through Query 1 (below). Based on the table created by Query 1, I have written another query (Query 2) to get the Double Moving Average.

As such, my current process requires two queries. My efforts so far to combine these two steps into a single query have not been successful.

My Question: Is there any way to calculate Double Moving Average in a single query?

QUERY 1 - For Single Moving Average:

    SELECT A.*, IIf([A].[VOL]>0,
    (SELECT AVG(B.[VOL])
    FROM [Turnover] as B
    WHERE (B.Code = A.Code) AND (B.YM Between A.YM - 1  AND A.YM - ([12] * 31))),
    (SELECT AVG(B.[VOL])
    FROM [Turnover] as B
    WHERE (B.Code = A.Code) AND (B.YM Between Now() - 31  AND A.YM - ([12] * 31)))) AS [Mvg Avg 1],  
    INTO [Model 12m]
    FROM [Turnover] AS A;

QUERY 2 - Double Moving Average (currently this refers to QUERY 1):

    SELECT A.*, IIf([A].[Mvg Avg 1]>0,(SELECT AVG(B.[Mvg Avg 1])
    FROM [Model 12m] as B
    WHERE (B.Code = A.Code) AND (B.YM Between A.YM - 1  AND A.YM - ([12] * 31))),(SELECT AVG(B.[Mvg Avg 1])
    FROM [Model 12m] as B
    WHERE (B.Code = A.Code) AND (B.YM Between Now() - 31  AND A.YM - ([12] * 31)))) AS [2 Mvg Avg],
    INTO [Model 12m - 2MA]
    FROM [Model 12m] AS A;
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Which RDBMS? And do you really need to do this in SQL rather than in your application? (Unless you have an RDBMS that implements LAG(), these queries tend to be quite inefficient in SQL.) –  MatBailie Nov 20 '12 at 12:04
    
@Dems: actually a moving average is quite easy using something like avg(x) over (order by some_col rows between current row and 12 preceding), no need for lag(). But SQL Server (which is obviously used here) does not support –  a_horse_with_no_name Nov 20 '12 at 13:03
1  
@a_horse_with_no_name - If rows between current row and 5 preceding is supported then that is LAG() functionally being supported. (5 preceding being the functionality required.) And if no LAG() functionality is supported, then rows between current row and 5 preceding implicitily isn't supported. It's symantics, I was just looking for a quick way of describing to the OP how to identify functionality to determine if the RDBMS is moving-average-fiendly. –  MatBailie Nov 20 '12 at 13:07
    
@a_horse_with_no_name SQL Server supports this in 2012, although you need to specify between 3 preceding and current row sqlfiddle.com/#!6/190bf/4 –  Laurence Nov 20 '12 at 13:53
2  
Do you have access to a calendar table? A simple table with one row per date, columns for the first day of the week, month, year, and a flag whether it is a business day or not, will help tremendously. Your current queries, using (12 * 31) to simulate a year, is not going to provide accurate results in Access or any other DBMS. –  ExactaBox Nov 20 '12 at 21:16

1 Answer 1

My Question: Is there any way to calculate Double Moving Average in a single query?

Since you're using Microsoft Access, there should be no need to do that. Save the first query as a new query. (For people who don't use MS Access, saving the SQL statement as a new query is equivalent to the SQL statement CREATE VIEW ....) Then use the second query as-is, or save it as another new query.

MS Access is really good at optimizing queries built on queries (views built on views).

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