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Okay, this is probably simple, but no matter how much coffee I apply, my brain isn't activating.

I need to match the following patterns with ANTLR:

5 YEARS
5 YEARS 2 MONTHS
5 YEARS 2 MONTHS 3 DAYS
2 MONTHS 3 DAYS
5 YEARS 3 DAYS
etc

So, I started out with the following rule:

atom returns [Object value]
  // start w/ a duration. Returned value will be a Joda Period object
  : (INTEGER ('YEAR'|'YEARS'))? (INTEGER ('MONTH'|'MONTHS'))? (INTEGER ('DAY'|'DAYS')?
  ;

Obviously that isn't going to work. I know this is simple, but I'm having a major brain 404 at the moment.

(Once I get the rule right, I'll move the definition down to the Lexer definitions)

Update: The following ruleset works, thanks to input provided previously. Thanks again.

datePeriod returns [Object value]
  : year month? week? day? EOF
  {
    $value = new Period($year.num, $month.num, $week.num, $day.num,0,0,0,0);
  }
  | month week? day? EOF
  {
    $value = new Period(0, $month.num, $week.num, $day.num,0,0,0,0);
  }
  | week day? EOF
  {
    $value = new Period(0,0, $week.num, $day.num,0,0,0,0);
  }
  | day EOF
  {
    $value = new Period(0, 0, 0, $day.num,0,0,0,0);
  }
  ;

year returns [int num]
  : INTEGER YEAR
  {
    $num = $INTEGER.int;
  }
  ;

month returns [int num]
  : INTEGER MONTH
  {
    $num = $INTEGER.int;
  }
  ;

week returns [int num]
  : INTEGER WEEK
    {
      $num = $INTEGER.int;
    }
  ;

day returns [int num]
  : INTEGER DAY
  {
    $num = $INTEGER.int;
  }
  ;

YEAR: ('YEAR'|'YEARS');
MONTH: ('MONTH'|'MONTHS');
WEEK: ('WEEK'|'WEEKS');
DAY: ('DAY'|'DAYS');

Unfortunately, I'm ANTLR IDEA is now tossing out warnings such as:

Decision can match input such as "INTEGER MONTH" using multiple alternatives: 1, 2

Jason

share|improve this question
    
That was a typo, I fixed it. The fact is, it has to be 0 or 1 YEAR/YEARS, 0 or 1 MONTH/MONTHS, and/or 0 or 1 DAY/DAYS. It has to have at least one of those tokens, but can have all three. –  Jason Nov 20 '12 at 12:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Below is a simple grammar that can parse the dates as you've described them. Note that the new-line character is non-trivial/not skipped because "4 YEARS\n4 MONTHS" should parse as two dates unambiguously.

grammar dates;

options {  
  language = Java; 
  output = AST;
}                     

parse
    : '\n'* date ('\n'+ date)* '\n'* EOF
    ;

date 
  // start w/ a duration. Returned value will be a Joda Period object
  : year month? day? 
    {System.out.println(String.format("\%dy \%dm \%dd", $year.num, $month.num, $day.num));} 
  | month day?
    {System.out.println(String.format("0y \%dm \%dd", $month.num, $day.num));}
  | day
    {System.out.println(String.format("0y 0m \%dd", $day.num));}
  ;

year returns [int num]
    : INTEGER YEAR
        {$num = $INTEGER.int;}
    ;
month returns [int num]
    : INTEGER MONTH
        {$num = $INTEGER.int;}
    ;
day returns [int num]
    : INTEGER DAY
        {$num = $INTEGER.int;}
    ;
DAY : 'DAY' | 'DAYS'
    ;    
MONTH
    : 'MONTH' | 'MONTHS'
    ;    
YEAR: 'YEAR' | 'YEARS'
    ;    
INTEGER
    : '0' 
    | ('1'..'9')('0'..'9')*
    ;
WS
    : ('\t' | ' ' | '\r') {skip();}
    ;

Test input:

5 YEARS
5 YEARS 2 MONTHS
5 YEARS 2 MONTHS 3 DAYS
2 MONTHS 3 DAYS
5 YEARS 3 DAYS
7 DAYS
1 MONTH

Test output:

5y 0m 0d
5y 2m 0d
5y 2m 3d
0y 2m 3d
5y 0m 3d
0y 0m 7d
0y 1m 0d
share|improve this answer
    
I may have read too much into your list of sample dates and assumed that these were all in the same stream. If that's not the case (i.e., if dates are being parsed as part of something else), my comment about (and code related to) new lines isn't relevant. –  user1201210 Nov 20 '12 at 16:30
    
Those aren't multiple streams, they are separate test cases, sorry. I looked at your response and added in your suggestions, but I'm getting several warnings now. I've updated the question. –  Jason Nov 20 '12 at 17:45
    
Never mind. Adding EOF to the end of each of those rules made the warnings magically disappear. –  Jason Nov 20 '12 at 18:02

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