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bool SomeFunction()
{

}

I cannot run the Borland C++ on my machine but I need to convert from C++ to VB so need help with this function.

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6  
Mmmmmmm, a bool? –  mfontanini Nov 20 '12 at 12:26
3  
It will result in undefined behaviour. –  juanchopanza Nov 20 '12 at 12:31
1  
Are you asking what the Borland C++ compiler will choose to return for this undefined piece of code? –  bitmask Nov 20 '12 at 12:44
1  
Yes I wanna know what will Borland C++ compiler will return :) –  user1838718 Nov 21 '12 at 2:49
    
undefined behavior... nice question i have an addition to it, change the bool for float or double ... it will corrupt FPU stack cousing random errors in FPU operation (anywhere where FPU is used outside this function) for non FPU types is safe (not correct but safe)... took mi a lot of time debugging while i find out this. –  Spektre Sep 7 '13 at 22:27

3 Answers 3

The function claims it returns a bool but it returns nothing. This should result in a compiler warning. If you use it to assign to something call the function, the result will be undefined behaviour:

bool b = SomeFunction(); // UB, SomeFunction is failing to return.
SomeFunction(); // still undefined behaviour

Only main() is allowed not to explicitly return, in which case it implicitly returns 0.

See here:

§6.6.3/2:

Flowing off the end of a function is equivalent to a return with no value; this results in undefined behavior in a value-returning function.

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1  
yes i want to know what will Borland C++ will return. –  user1838718 Nov 21 '12 at 2:47
    
sorry above comment i post in wrong box. thank you for your answer. Actually there is a code like Try { int ret = SomeFunction() if (ret) { //do sth .... ... .. . } } Catch { MessageDlg("Error".....) } it didn't go to catch (no error message pop up) and i don't know is it enter the if-clause? i didn't write the C++ piece so i try to understand how it is working in order to convert it to VB. –  user1838718 Nov 21 '12 at 3:22
    
@user1838718 you can edit your question to add the code snippet. It still looks like undefined behaviour, because it can flow off the end. –  juanchopanza Nov 21 '12 at 6:31

I've compiled the following code on Borland XE2:

bool SomeFunction()
{
}

int main()
{
    bool x = SomeFunction();
    // ...
}

SomeFunction() translated to the following x86 assembler code:

push ebp
mov ebp,esp
pop ebp
ret

The assignment in main() translated to:

call SomeFunction()
mov [ebp-$31],al

where [ebp-$31] is the location of x. That means, the content of register al will end up in bool x. If al was 0, x will be false, otherwise x will be true. On my system, this was always true, but this depends on the context. Also you may get different results for debug and release.

The conclusion is, of course, x is undefined. The given code is a bit like writing

bool x;
if (x)
{
    // ...
}

I am inclined to think that the definition of SomeFunction() should trigger not just a compiler warning, but an error. Visual C++ does so, I don't know about other compilers.

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It should return true; or return false;

bool SomeFunction()
{

    return true;

    // or

    return false;

}

If your compiler does not have bool built in then you can do this:

typedef int bool;
#define true 1
#define false 0

int main(void)
{

    bool answer;
    answer = true;

    while(true)
    {

    }

   return 0;
}
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Thank for your code but i can use boolean instead of bool :) –  user1838718 Nov 21 '12 at 2:54
    
If your compiler does not support bool you should start using a better compiler, bool is in C++ for a long time now, it's no brand new rocket-science thing. Writing code like this is a terrible solution. –  KillianDS Nov 26 '12 at 8:25

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