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I have two data sources.
One of them is a cached list, and another one is the new data pushed via IObservable<T>.

I want to use Rx to find out which operations need to be performed on the cached list A to make it identical in its order and contents to the new data.

I am looking for a function that takes a IEnumerable<T> a and IObservable<T> b and returns an observable that pushes operations (insertions and deletions) on a that would make it identical to b without waiting for b to complete.

Note: I know I can't modify a list or observable. I don't want to.

I only want to know what operations, in what order would turn a hypothetical list identical in its order and sequence to A into a list identical in its order and sequence to B, as soon as these operations become known.

Both a and b are unique and sorted, T implements IComparable<T> and IEquatable<T>.

public static IObservable<Tuple<int, bool>> IndexDelta<T>(
    IEnumerable<T> a,
    IObservable<T> b
) where T : IEquatable<T>, IComparable<T> {
    // ???
}

I will use ints in my example.

What?!

Consider these two sequences:

A: [150, 100, 70, 30, 20]
B: [300, 200, 100, 70, 60, 50, 20]

The goal is to find a series of delete/insert operations that transform A into B. Think A is a cached data source, B is the new data, I want to know how to translate these updates to a grid without reloading it.

Rows are sorted in both sources.

I want the output to be in form

[(0, true), (1, true), (0, false), (3, false), (4, true), (5, true)]

I would later group these operations by boolean flag:

deleted:  [0, 3]
inserted: [0, 1, 4, 5]

which would translate to human language as

  1. Delete A0 and A3:

    A = [150, 100, 70, 30, 20] = [100, 70, 20]

  2. Insert B0, B1, B4, B5 into A:

    A = [300, 200, 100, 70, 60, 50, 20]

  3. Now A is identical to B.

Requirements

There are several important things I want to note:

  1. A is a list that is guaranteed not to change. B is a cold observable that takes some time to complete but yields first items pretty soon. Therefore, the result observable need to be pushed as soon as enough data is available.

  2. Items are guaranteed to be unique with IEquatable<T> in both sources.

  3. Items are non-mutable and are guaranteed to be sorted descending using IComparable<T> in both sources.

  4. It is preferable to optimize for new items being added to the left of B. This is the most common scenario. It is however possible that items are deleted or inserted at any other place, given their timestamp is appropriate (doesn't ruin sorting). Think an iPhone camera roll.

  5. (*) I'm interested in a pure functional solution if this is possible.

Pseudocode Sketch

I sketched a pseudocode algorithm that implements this in an imperative way.

I made up Current, MoveNext, await and yield push semantics but the idea should make some sense.

IObservable<Tuple<int, bool>> IndexDelta(a, b)
{
    var indexA = 0;
    var indexB = 0;

    while (true) {
        var headA = a.Current;
        var headB = b.Current; 

        if (headA == null && headB == null) {
            return yield break; // both sequences are over
        }

        var reportDeletion = () => {
            yield push Tuple.Create(indexA, false);
            await a.MoveNext(); // this one is fast
        }

        var reportInsertion = () => {
            yield push Tuple.Create(indexB, true);
            await b.MoveNext(); // can take a long time
        }

        if (headA == null) { // No source item at this position
            reportInsertion();
            continue;
        }

        if (headB == null) { // No fetched item at this position
            reportDeletion();
            continue;
        }

        switch (headB.CompareTo(headA)) {
            case 0:
                yield continue;
                break;
            case 1: // Fetched item is newer than source item
                reportInsertion();
                break; 
            case -1: // Source item is newer than fetched item
                reportDeletion();
                break; 
        }

        indexA++;
        indexB++;
    }
} 

I believe you could implement something very similar with Subject<T>. However I don't want to proceed with this solution because I'm wondering if it is possible to solve it purely by composing Rx functions such as Aggregate, Zip or CombineLatest.

What are your thoughts?

share|improve this question
    
This doesn't quite make sense. You talk about insertions and deletes on IEnumerable or IObservable yet these are not lists. You can only get the next value out of them. You can't insert or delete from them. Your psueodo code sketch is also totally wrong as IObservable cannot be created from functions with yield. Only IEnumerables can be magically generated using yield. Do you understand what is the difference between IEnumerable and IOBservable and what they are for? –  bradgonesurfing Nov 20 '12 at 12:41
    
@brad: My pseudocode is pseudo for a reason. Yes I know I can't do that, I just outlined the algorithm that could be implemented by pushing to Subject which I don't want to use if it is possible to go pure Rx. –  Dan Abramov Nov 20 '12 at 12:43
    
But you still talk about inserting and deleting to IEnumerable. As I said it is not a list. What do you mean by inserting or deleting to an IEnumerable. Do you mean a list? –  bradgonesurfing Nov 20 '12 at 12:44
    
I may not have made myself clear enough: I don't want to transform my input. I don't want to change a or b. I want to get a list of differences between a and b in terms of insertions and deletions. –  Dan Abramov Nov 20 '12 at 12:45
    
Do you want a diff algorithm on two lists? –  bradgonesurfing Nov 20 '12 at 12:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Seems to work ...:

void Main()
{
    var a = new int?[] {150, 100, 70, 30, 20 };
    var b = new int?[] {300, 200, 100, 70, 60, 50, 20 };
    var result = IndexDelta(a, b);
    result.Dump();
}

// Define other methods and classes here
IObservable<Tuple<int, bool>> IndexDelta(IEnumerable<int?> a, IEnumerable<int?> b)
{
    var observable = Observable.Create<Tuple<int, bool>>(o => {
        var indexA = 0;
        var indexB = 0;
        var aEnumerator = a.GetEnumerator();
        var bEnumerator = b.GetEnumerator();
        var aHasNext = aEnumerator.MoveNext();
        var bHasNext = bEnumerator.MoveNext();

        while(true) {
            if (aHasNext == false && bHasNext == false) {
                "Completed".Dump();
                o.OnCompleted(); // both sequences are over
                break;
            }

            var headA = aEnumerator.Current;
            var headB = bEnumerator.Current; 

            headA.Dump("A");
            headB.Dump("B");

            Action reportDeletion = () => {
                o.OnNext(Tuple.Create(indexA, false));
                aHasNext = aEnumerator.MoveNext(); // this one is fast
            };
            Action reportInsertion = () => {
                o.OnNext(Tuple.Create(indexB, true));
                bHasNext = bEnumerator.MoveNext(); // can take a long time
            };

            if (headA == null) { // No source item at this position
                reportInsertion();
                continue;
            }

            if (headB == null) { // No fetched item at this position
                reportDeletion();
                continue;
            }   

            switch (headB.Value.CompareTo(headA.Value)) {
                case 0:     
                    aHasNext = aEnumerator.MoveNext();
                    bHasNext = bEnumerator.MoveNext();
                    indexA++;
                    indexB++;
                    break;
                case 1: // Fetched item is newer than source item
                    reportInsertion();
                    indexB++;
                    break; 
                case -1: // Source item is newer than fetched item
                    reportDeletion();
                    indexA++;
                    break; 
            }           
        }
        return Disposable.Empty;
    });     
    return observable;
} 
share|improve this answer
    
This comes close although there are a few issues: b is an IObservable (I guess you could call ToEnumerable on it), items are not nullable, and the solution is for int?s and not for T where T: IComparable. –  Dan Abramov Nov 20 '12 at 13:56
    
I wonder if it is possible to do this via Rx function composition? Break two observables in pairs, aggregate them, whatever? –  Dan Abramov Nov 20 '12 at 13:57
    
@DanAbramov It's easier to make a and b IObservables from the start then use Subscribe(o) on both instead of using MoveNext and Current all over the place. –  Richard Hein Nov 20 '12 at 14:38
    
I'll try that, thanks. –  Dan Abramov Nov 20 '12 at 16:03
1  
@DanAbramov Instead of using GetEnumerator, Current and MoveNext, you'd use Subscribe(o) where o is the IObserver parameter passed into Observable.Create (well, in the Func passed into Create()). This would require quite a few changes, sorry I don't have time right now, maybe later if you are still stuck. Also, yes, you'd probably be able to compose other operators instead, like Merge both lists, get the Distinct elements, compare them against the two lists, etc.... Again, if I have time later, I'll try to update this answer. –  Richard Hein Nov 20 '12 at 16:42

This code is based on Richard's answer but works with any T.
I haven't been able to escape the curse of ToEnumerable though—any help is appreciated.

IObservable<Tuple<int, T, bool>> IndexDelta<T>(
    IObservable<T> first, IObservable<T> second
)
    where T : IComparable, IEquatable<T>
{
    return Observable.Create<Tuple<int, T, bool>> (o => {
        var a = first.ToEnumerable ().GetEnumerator ();
        var b = second.ToEnumerable ().GetEnumerator ();

        var indexA = -1;
        var indexB = -1;

        var hasNextA = true;
        var hasNextB = true;

        var headA = default(T);
        var headB = default(T);

        Action<bool> advanceA = (bool reportDeletion) => {
            if (reportDeletion) {
                o.OnNext (Tuple.Create (indexA, headA, false));
            }

            if (hasNextA = a.MoveNext ()) {
                indexA++;
                headA = a.Current;
            }
        };

        Action<bool> advanceB = (bool reportInsertion) => {
            if (reportInsertion) {
                o.OnNext (Tuple.Create (indexB, headB, true));
            }

            if (hasNextB = b.MoveNext ()) {
                indexB++;
                headB = b.Current;
            }
        };

        advanceA (false);
        advanceB (false);

        while (true) {
            if (!hasNextA && !hasNextB) {
                o.OnCompleted ();
                break;
            }

            if (!hasNextA) {
                advanceB (true);
                continue;
            } 

            if (!hasNextB) {
                advanceA (true);
                continue;
            } 

            switch (headA.CompareTo (headB)) {
            case 0:
                advanceA (false);
                advanceB (false);
                break;
            case 1:
                advanceA (true);
                break; 
            case -1:
                advanceB (true);
                break; 
            }          
        }

        return Disposable.Create (() => {
            a.Dispose ();
            b.Dispose ();
        });
    });     
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Um, care to explain the downvote? I'm using this code in production and it works just fine. –  Dan Abramov Dec 10 '12 at 16:59

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