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I've an abstract C# class that is inherited through many classes where I want to add a static function into the generic class.

public abstract class A<T>: where T
{
    protected A()
    {
        // setup class A
    }

    public List<T> GetResult()
    {
        return new List<String>();
    }
}

public class B : A<String>
{
    public string FooBar()
    {
        // do something
    }
}

Now, I'd like to add a static class to the abstract class A

pulic static List<T> GetResults()
{
    var foo = new A();
    return foo.GetResult();
}

Now, I'd like to call the new static function through the inherited class

B.GetResults();

Is something like this possible with an abstract class?

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closed as not a real question by Oded, dove, stealthyninja, Lex, Julien Poulin Nov 21 '12 at 10:23

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Do you mean you want to add a static method? –  Oded Nov 20 '12 at 12:39
2  
You can call static method only through Type declared it. –  Dmitry Martovoi Nov 20 '12 at 12:40
7  
var foo = new A() for an abstract class seems to be a rather bad start... –  Raphaël Althaus Nov 20 '12 at 12:40
2  
Your question is very unclear, as all kinds of bits of your code don't make sense - such as trying to construct an instance of your abstract class. –  Jon Skeet Nov 20 '12 at 12:40
3  
@DmitryMartovoi: Actually, if GetResults is defined as a static method on base class A, and B derives from A, you can call the method using the syntax B.GetResults(). –  Martin Liversage Nov 20 '12 at 12:45

2 Answers 2

Your question is unclear because you've given code which is invalid in a number of ways. However, you can create a static method in an abstract generic base class, and you can call it "via" the name of a derived type... but it's not particularly useful to do so.

So this code works:

using System;

public abstract class A<T> where T : new()
{
    public static T CreateInstance()
    {
        return new T();
    }
}

public class B : A<int>
{
}

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(B.CreateInstance());
    }
}

... but the call to B.CreateInstance() is exactly equivalent to:

A<int>.CreateInstance();

... and indeed, that's what it's compiled to.

In general I would strongly advise against accessing static members via a derived class. So similar, instead of writing ASCIIEncoding.ASCII, I'd recommend writing Encoding.ASCII - it's clearer what you're using.

Now whether this actually solves your problem or not is a different matter - it's unclear, as you haven't really explained what you're trying to achieve, only the manner in which you were trying to achieve it.

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You can try this:

public abstract class A<T, TSelf> // TSelf name just to clarify here
    where TSelf : A<T, TSelf>, new()
{
    public abstract List<T> GetResult();

    public static List<T> GetResults()
    {
        var foo = new TSelf();
        return foo.GetResult();
    }
}

public class B : A<String, B>
{
    public override List<String> GetResult()
    {
        // Do something....
    }
}

Now you can call:

List<String> results = B.GetResults();
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1  
+1 for quite an out of the box approach –  Amit Mittal Nov 20 '12 at 12:56

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