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I have a list of entries that i need to know if they are in a column of a table. That's easy but i don't know how to mark when a entry of this list doesn't appear in the DB column. And if it's possible know the count of results in the Db column for each element. When an element of the list doesn't appear in the DB column the output must be 0.

When i say a list it's that:

select xxxxxx from TABLE WHERE field in (a, b, c, d, ... , z);
share|improve this question
    
:USE SELECT NVL(column_name,0) OR USE CASE OR DECODE statement ,in case the column in not null –  Gaurav Soni Nov 20 '12 at 12:56
    
@GauravSoni - There is a fundamental difference between a row of data not existing and the value being NULL. In the OPs case NVL will not help resolve the fact that there are no rows of data corresponding to the 0 that the OP wants to output. –  MatBailie Nov 20 '12 at 13:01
    
@Dems:Your right ,I dint get the question correctly .Thanks for the explaination –  Gaurav Soni Nov 20 '12 at 13:03
1  
This would be a lot clearer if you had some example data and results. –  Laurence Nov 20 '12 at 13:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use a (global) temporary table or nested table object.

  • Temp table (SQLFiddle demo)

    CREATE GLOBAL TEMPORARY TABLE tmp (field NUMBER);
    
    INSERT INTO tmp (...);
    
    SELECT tmp.field, COUNT(t.field)
      FROM table t
     RIGHT JOIN tmp ON t.field = tmp.field
     GROUP BY tmp.field;
    
  • Table object (demo)

    CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE tab AS TABLE OF NUMBER;
    /
    
    SELECT tmp.column_value field, COUNT(t.field)
      FROM table t
     RIGHT JOIN TABLE(tab(a,b,c,d,e)) tmp ON t.field = tmp.column_value
     GROUP BY tmp.column_value;
    
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, very helpful. One last question. Is it necesarry to delete the temporary table or it will dissapear when I disconect from the DB ??? –  Jorge Vega Sánchez Nov 20 '12 at 14:14
1  
No, temporary tables in Oracle are global: the structure is shared accross sessions (all sessions can use it but they only see their own data). Unless you plan to only run this code once, you should not drop the temp table. Create it once, and reuse it the next time you need it. They are like views in persistence (you wouldn't create/drop a view every time you need it). The data in the temp table will be deleted automatically at the end of your session or transaction (decided at creation). –  Vincent Malgrat Nov 20 '12 at 14:41

In order to do this you first need a way of knowing what your list of values to be counted is. You have to generate this yourself somehow and store them either in a sub-query of some description or create a table or view with this information.

You can then join to your main table and work out the numbers.

Using the following table as an example:

create table tmp_test ( numbers number, letters varchar2(1));

, which has had data populated as follows:

 insert into tmp_test
 select mod(level, 500), chr(mod(level,13) + 97) 
   from dual
connect by level <= 1000

If we assume that the values you're after are numbers between 95 and 105 your query would be:

select all_vals, count(b.numbers)
  from ( select level + 94 as all_vals
           from dual
        connect by level <= 11
                ) a
  left outer join tmp_test b
    on a.all_vals = b.numbers
 group by a.all_vals
 order by all_vals
       ;

  ALL_VALS COUNT(B.NUMBERS)
---------- ----------------
        95               10
        96               10
        97               10
        98               10
        99               10
       100                0
       101                0
       102                0
       103                0
       104                0
       105                0

11 rows selected.

If, however, you wanted the count of the numbers of values in the letters column that were in a, l, m and p if would be as follows:

select all_vals, count(b.letters)
  from ( select 'a' as all_vals from dual
          union all
         select 'l' from dual
          union all
         select 'm' from dual
          union all
         select 'p' from dual
                ) a
  left outer join tmp_test b
    on a.all_vals = b.letters
 group by a.all_vals
 order by all_vals
       ;

A COUNT(B.LETTERS)
- ----------------
a               76
l               77
m               77
p                0

As stated the sub-queries could easily be substituted for a view or a table.

The LEFT OUTER JOIN is what makes the difference here. You have your generated list of values that you want to count and then check whether they exist in the column that you're interested in.

Here's a working SQL Fiddle with these examples.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I don't understand a part of a SQL sentence. In 'select mod(level, 500), chr(mod(level,13) + 97) from dual connect by level <= 1000', what's the effect or meaning of 'connect by level <= 1000'. It's the first time i see the connect statement like you write in your answer. –  Jorge Vega Sánchez Nov 20 '12 at 16:14
1  
It's simply a way of generating rows. Try it for yourself! –  Ben Nov 20 '12 at 16:18

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