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I have found few similar questions on stackoverflow but none of them seems to provide a real clear solution for my case.

I hope with a screenshot I can show the pain with using a table:

enter image description here

The bottom two rows are defined as tr and td within a table. The structure is perfect and alignment of the labels and textfields are perfect. However if I wanted to style a well class (e.g. <div class='well'> ... </div>) around only two rows, the table approach would fail. Simply because you are not allowed having any div inside a table, which is only excepting tr and td.

So I took the first two rows out of the table and made it as pure divs. You can see the result as the first two rows above in the grey well.

<div class='well'>
  <div>
    <div class='block_inline'> ... </div>
    <div class='block_inline'> ... </div>
  </div> 
  <div>
    <div class='block_inline'> ... </div>
    <div class='block_inline'> ... </div>
  </div>
</div>

In itself the well class is now beautifully rendered around the two rows, however the alignment is now a mess. How can I make them still be centred and have the text-fields to be aligned vertically next to each other?

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1  
Are you absolutely certain that your form is not tabular data? If you have a list of items that were input via this form, would you be marking it up with a table? Also, tbody can be used multiple times in the same table to group rows together in the same way that colgroup is used for grouping columns. –  cimmanon Nov 20 '12 at 13:19
    
Well considering the fact that it's a form. tables, theads and tbodies are entirely the wrong approach.. input's, textarea's and the likes usually have no place in tables.. –  Damien Overeem Nov 20 '12 at 15:27
    
@cimmanon You were right. I had no idea you can use <tbody> several times within the table. Therefore what I was trying to achieve would work. Thanks for that. However I think I had the wrong approach anyway, since what I am trying to achieve isn't a tabular data in first place. –  Hooman Nov 20 '12 at 15:38
    
@DamienOvereem There's no reason table elements cannot belong inside a table, provided they can be classified as tabular data. A collection key/value pairs can be tabular data, and a data entry form is a collection of key(label)/value(input fields) pairs. I don't mean to suggest that every form is tabular data, but sometimes it really is if you look at the big picture. –  cimmanon Nov 20 '12 at 15:41
    
Hence usually. There are exceptions. –  Damien Overeem Nov 20 '12 at 15:42

4 Answers 4

To get this effect with using divs, you just us the the display property with table, table-row and table-cell:

HTML:

<div class='well'>
  <div class="row">
    <div class='block_inline'> Title </div>
    <div class='block_inline'> ... </div>
  </div> 
  <div class="row">
    <div class='block_inline'> Due Date Time </div>
    <div class='block_inline'> ... </div>
  </div>
</div>​

CSS:

div
{
    border: 1px solid #333;
}

.well
{
    display: table;
    width: 70%;
}

.row
{
    display: table-row;
}

.block_inline
{
    display: table-cell;
    width: 50%;
}

This mimics the behaviour of a table, but leaves the markup nice and semantic. This is also useful for solving "remaining space columns" issues :)

http://jsfiddle.net/Kyle_Sevenoaks/e7VeU/

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1  
How can it be semantic if div has no semantic meaning at all? –  cimmanon Nov 20 '12 at 13:16
    
Ah, I meant something different. You can use semantic markup if you choose, and still apply these styles. :) –  Kyle Nov 20 '12 at 13:18

Well first of all the semantics are a mess.. this is how i do it:

<form>
    <div class="row">
        <label for="input_1">Title</label>
        <input type="text" name="input_1" id="input_1">
    </div>
    <div class="row">
        <label for="input_2">Due date time*</label>
        <input type="text" name="input_2" id="input_2">
    </div>

</form>

with style:

div.row {
    clear: both;
}

label {
    display: inline-block;
    width: 300px;
}

input {
    display: inline-block;
}

Make adjustments where neccesary.

The use of div class="row" could be replaced by fieldsets and definition lists. Take a look at http://www.gethifi.com/blog/html-forms-the-right-ways for that.

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You can also try this method

<div class="first">
<div class="line1">
   <label>One</label>
   <select>
  <option value="volvo">Volvo</option>
  <option value="saab">Saab</option>
  <option value="mercedes">Mercedes</option>
  <option value="audi">Audi</option>
</select>
    </div>
    <div class="line2">
    <label>two</label>
   <select>
  <option value="volvo">Volvo</option>
  <option value="saab">Saab</option>
  <option value="mercedes">Mercedes</option>
  <option value="audi">Audi</option>
</select>
</div>
<div>

Demo; fiddle

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I like to use ULs for form layout: http://jsfiddle.net/BKgB9/

<form>
 <div>
    <ul>
        <li><label>Type:</label><input type="text" /></li>
        <li><label>Reminder:</label><input type="text" /></li>
    </ul>
 </div>
</form>

div {
 background:#dcdcdc;
 border:1px solid #999;
 padding:20px;
 display:inline-block;
}

div ul li {
 margin-bottom:10px;
}

div ul li label {
 float:left;
 width:85px;
}
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