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this code

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

struct obj
{
  std::string name;
  int age;
  float money;

  obj():name("NO_NAME"),age(0),money(0.0f){}
  obj(const std::string& _name, const int& _age, const float& _money):name(_name),age(_age),money(_money){}

  obj(obj&& tmp): name(tmp.name), age(tmp.age), money(tmp.money) {}
  obj& operator=(obj&&) {return *this;}

};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  std::vector<obj> v;
  for( int i = 0; i < 5000000; ++i )
  {
    v.emplace_back(obj("Jon", 45, 500.6f));
  }
  return(0);
}

is about 2 time slower than the equivalent with v.push_back(obj("Jon", 45, 500.6f)); and I don't get why.

I have tested this with bot g++ 4.7.2 and clang++ 3.3.

Where I'm wrong ?


now that i have corrected my move construnctor i will add more

this is a push_back version

this is the emplace_back version

I'm testing this 2 with the time utility under Linux and compiling them with

g++-4.7 -std=c++11 -s -O3 -DNDEBUG

or

clang++ -std=c++11 -s -O3 -DNDEBUG
share|improve this question
2  
Well, well... If you want to move... shouldn't you try actually moving? The move constructor does not move anything; it copies everything (hint: there's no call to std::move anywhere). FYI the compiler generated move ctor will do the right thing. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 20 '12 at 13:09
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes it's not implicit the fact that "move semantic" should "move" things ... ? –  user1797612 Nov 20 '12 at 13:12
    
Only rvalues get moved implicitly. All the things in the member initialization list of the move constructor have names, and thus are lvalues. I guess the confusing bit is that you were not aware that named rvalue references are lvalues. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 20 '12 at 13:12
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes mmm, ok, now the only thing that i got is that with this std::move my move constructor is highly inefficient, it still doesn't beat the push_back, how to improve this ? –  user1797612 Nov 20 '12 at 13:15
    
In the linked versions I get 1.61 on push_back and 1.39 on emplace_back. –  ronag Nov 20 '12 at 13:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Not doing anything is better. You tried to make it faster (faster than what? did you actually profile before you wrote the move constructor?), but you broke it.

The compiler generates copy and move constructors and assignment operators for free, and she does it right. By deciding to write your own, you are telling the compiler that you know better, so she just gets out of the way and lets you improve break it on your own.

The first thing you broke, is that you made your move constructor actually copy. Things with a name are lvalues, and lvalues cannot be moved implicitly even if they are rvalue references. So the initializers need to actually call std::move.

The second thing you broke is that you didn't make the move constructor declare that it does not throw by adding noexcept to it. The compiler generated one had this. By not declaring that no exceptions are thrown, the implementation of std::vector will probably not use moves when reallocating the underlying storage: it cannot provide the strong exception guarantee without the assurance that moves don't throw.

Will doing all this make it perform better? Maybe. Maybe not. Your implementation may be doing the small string optimization on std::string, and that means that there is no dynamic allocation: the whole string "Jon", being small, will be stored directly in the std::string object. This makes a move have the same costs as a copy.

You can make the whole obj structure take advantage of a cheap move by allocating it dynamically, and using unique_ptr. This will make moves cheaper than copies, even in the presence of the small string optimization. However, you are paying for that cheapness with the cost of allocation and extra indirection. Whether that is desirable or not only you can tell.

share|improve this answer
    
Though this has nothing to do with why a proper emplace_back call would be slower than push_back, since the move constructor is never called with a proper emplace_back invocation. –  ronag Nov 20 '12 at 13:32
1  
@ronag: except when the vector reallocates the storage... –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 20 '12 at 13:33
    
Good point, I didn't consider that. –  ronag Nov 20 '12 at 13:36
    
I want to make it faster than a push_back. but you know what?!, g++4.7.2 generates a slower code than g++ 4.6, and with g++ 4.6 emplace_back is faster than a push_back, i will add a noexcept but for what i see there is something wrong with g++ 4.7.2 –  user1797612 Nov 20 '12 at 13:36
1  
Well, actually I was suggesting not defining them at all, or defining them as = default;. It's safer to let the compiler do it right. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 20 '12 at 14:07

Instead of

v.emplace_back(obj("Jon", 45, 500.6f));

try

v.emplace_back("Jon", 45, 500.6f);

push_back has a move-enabled overload. emplace_back is for constructing in-place.

Edit: What R. Martinho Fernandes said. :)

obj(obj&& tmp): name(std::move(tmp.name)), age(std::move(tmp.age)), money(std::move(tmp.money)) {}
share|improve this answer
    
I have already tried this, it's still slower than a push_back, much slower. –  user1797612 Nov 20 '12 at 13:11
3  
@moswald you also need to add noexcept on the move constructor, otherwise gcc std::vector won't move anything at all (on insertion or during reallocation) –  Thomas Petit Nov 20 '12 at 13:15
1  
@moswald it is unless you declared one, or unless you declare a copy constructor. Or unless you are using MSVC10. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 20 '12 at 16:38
1  
@moswald for completeness, in that case, you may want to consider declaring the move constructor as = default; and have the compiler generate it anyway. Assuming the default semantics are desireable, of course. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 20 '12 at 17:05
1  
@moswald forced by the standard I think. 23.2.1.10 "if an exception is thrown by a push_back() or push_front() function, that function has no effects." Move constructor cannot guarantee no-thrown except if marked noexcept. If the move constructor can throw the compiler has to fall back on copy when reallocating to keep the strong exception guarantee. –  Thomas Petit Nov 21 '12 at 18:57

This is probably what you want:

struct obj
{
  std::string name;
  int age;
  float money;

  obj()
      : name("NO_NAME")
      , age(0)
      , money(0.0f)
  {
  }

  obj(std::string _name, int _age, float _money)
      : name(std::move(_name))
      , age(std::move(_age))
      , money(std::move(_money))
  {
  }
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  std::vector<obj> v;
  for( int i = 0; i < 5000000; ++i )
  {
    v.emplace_back("Jon", 45, 500.6f);
  }
  return(0);
}

Note that I changed your obj(std::string _name, int _age, float _money) constructor to move _name instead of making an unnecessary copy of it.

Your are also calling emplace_back incorrectly, should be emplace_back("Jon", 45, 500.6f).

All the other stuff is automatically optimally generated by the compiler.

share|improve this answer
    
this is comparable to the answer from moswald, the problem is that this is slower if compared to a push_back ... it's not supposed to be faster ? –  user1797612 Nov 20 '12 at 13:17
    
It is faster, not sure how you are benchmarking it, but I would guess you are doing something wrong. Maybe you could create a full sample (including timing) on ideone.com? –  ronag Nov 20 '12 at 13:20
    
Also, in addition to mosvalds answer I also changed your obj(name, age, float money) constructor to move _name instead of making an unnecessary copy of it. –  ronag Nov 20 '12 at 13:21
    
i have added more on my first post, i will re-check my code –  user1797612 Nov 20 '12 at 13:26

You should move the data from the argument to the move constructor:

obj(obj&& tmp)
: 
name(std::move(tmp.name)), age(std::move(tmp.age)), money(std::move(tmp.money)) {}

Although this should be irrelevant if you use emplace_back correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
Why would this make a difference to a proper emplace_back call? Isn't the object constructed "in-place", I would more look at moving the parameters sent to obj(const std::string& _name, const int& _age, const float& _money) (see my answer), which I think is the only method invoked by a proper emplace_back invocation. –  ronag Nov 20 '12 at 13:23
    
@ronag I disn't see the emplace_back. Of course, it would make no difference whatsoever! –  juanchopanza Nov 20 '12 at 13:25
    
what do you mean with " if you use emplace_back correctly.", what can be improved in the use of emplace_back in this code ? I get that i have wroted the move constructor in the wrong way, but what about the usage ? –  user1797612 Nov 20 '12 at 14:06
    
@user1797612 use v.emplace_back("Jon", 45, 500.6f);, as has been pointed out in another post. emplace_back constructs an object from the arguments. The class' move constructor doesn't come into it (unless the vector gets resized as a result of the emplace_back). –  juanchopanza Nov 20 '12 at 14:08
    
@juanchopanza but this is correct v.emplace_back(obj("Jon", 45, 500.6f)); –  user1797612 Nov 20 '12 at 14:10

The running time is dominated by the construction of the std::string from the string literal, so the difference between a move construction and an emplace construction is trivial.

This takes 400 ms on my machine:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

struct obj
{
    string name;
    int age;
    float money;
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    vector<obj> v;
    for( int i = 0; i < 5000000; ++i )
    {
        v.emplace_back(obj{"Jon", 45, 500.6f});
    }
    return v.size();
}

This takes 80 ms on my machine:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

struct obj
{
    int age;
    float money;
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    vector<obj> v;
    for( int i = 0; i < 5000000; ++i )
    {
        v.emplace_back(obj{45, 500.6f});
    }
    return v.size();
}

Note that a plain struct will have a sensible default move constructor generated for it.

This already takes 220 ms on my machine:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    int t = 0;
    for( int i = 0; i < 5000000; ++i )
    {
        string s("Jon");
        t += s.size();
    }
    return t;
}
share|improve this answer
    
solving this question teaches me a lot, but strings are still treated more like a const pointer than a real string and i don't get why, well i get the part for the C compatibility, but it's really an old approach. thanks for this. –  user1797612 Nov 20 '12 at 14:08
    
It is possible to design an immutable string class that will not take a copy of a string literal, however this adds complexity (see Java's String vs StringBuilder classes). It's a design tradeoff. –  Andrew Tomazos Nov 20 '12 at 14:27

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