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Im using MEF in .Net 4.0 to save me a good amount of abstract factory code and config gubbins. Cannot move to .net 4.5 as it is not deployed.

The class

/// <summary>
/// Factory relies upon the use of the .net 4.0 MEF framework
/// All processors need to export themselves to make themselves visible to the 'Processors' import property auto MEF population
/// This class is implemented as a singleton
/// </summary>
public class MessageProsessorFactory
{
    private static readonly string pluginFilenameFilter = "Connectors.*.dll";
    private static CompositionContainer _container;
    private static MessageProsessorFactory _instance;
    private static object MessageProsessorFactoryLock = new object();

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes the <see cref="MessageProsessorFactory" /> class.
    /// Loads all MEF imports
    /// </summary>
    /// <exception cref="System.NotSupportedException"></exception>
    private MessageProsessorFactory()
    {
        lock (MessageProsessorFactoryLock)
        {
            if (_container == null)
            {
                RemoveDllSecurityZoneRestrictions();

                //Create a thread safe composition container
                _container = new CompositionContainer(new DirectoryCatalog(".", pluginFilenameFilter), true, null);

                _container.ComposeParts(this);
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// A list of detected class instances that support IMessageProcessor
    /// </summary>
    [ImportMany(typeof(IMessageProcessor), RequiredCreationPolicy = CreationPolicy.NonShared)]
    private List<Lazy<IMessageProcessor, IMessageProccessorExportMetadata>> Processors { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the message factory.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="messageEnvelope">The message envelope.</param>
    /// <returns><see cref="IMessageProcessor"/></returns>
    /// <exception cref="System.NotSupportedException">The supplied target is not supported:  + target</exception>
    public static IMessageProcessor GetMessageProcessor(MessageEnvelope messageEnvelope)
    {
        if (_instance == null)
            _instance = new MessageProsessorFactory();

        var p = _instance.Processors.FirstOrDefault(
                    s => s.Metadata.ExpectedType.AssemblyQualifiedName == messageEnvelope.AssemblyQualifiedName);

        if (p == null)
            throw new NotSupportedException(
                "The supplied type is not supported: " + messageEnvelope.AssemblyQualifiedName);

       return p.Value;

    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Removes any zone flags otherwise MEF wont load files with
    /// a URL zone flag set to anything other than 'MyComputer', we are trusting all pluggins here.
    /// http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms537183(v=vs.85).aspx
    /// </summary>
    private static void RemoveDllSecurityZoneRestrictions()
    {
        string path = System.IO.Path.GetDirectoryName(
                            System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location);

        foreach (var filePath in Directory.EnumerateFiles(path, pluginFilenameFilter))
        {
            var zone = Zone.CreateFromUrl(filePath);

            if (zone.SecurityZone != SecurityZone.MyComputer)
            {
                var fileInfo = new FileInfo(filePath);
                fileInfo.DeleteAlternateDataStream("Zone.Identifier");
            }
        }
    }
}

After _container.ComposeParts(this); is called, Processors is populated with all the IMessageProcessor implementations found. Great.

Notes

  • GetMessageProcessor is called by many threads.
  • We have no control over how a developer might structure there class implementations of IMessageProcessor, therefore we cannot guarantee them to be thread safe - re-entrant. However the class must be instrumented with the Export attribute.

The export attribute

 [MetadataAttribute]
[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class, AllowMultiple = false)]
public class MessageProccessorExportAttribute : ExportAttribute
{
    public MessageProccessorExportAttribute()
        : base(typeof(IMessageProcessor))
    {
    }

    public Type ExpectedType { get; set; }
}
  • ExpectedType is just metadata that notes what IMessageProcessor.ProcessMessage() expects to be dealing with, purely implementation detail.

My problem is that I read everywhere that each Imported instance will be a Singleton, regardless of its activation policy when its constructed via a Lazy<> reference.

Therefore we cannot allow an instance from the MEF to be returned from GetMessageProcessor, since multiple threads are going to get the same instance and that is undesirable. Ahhh! I was wondering if the following 'work around' is the best approach or have i got the MEF insistence concept wrong.

My workaround is to change the seemingly pointless RequiredCreationPolicy = CreationPolicy.NonShared attribute setting to CreationPolicy.Shared.

Then change the function GetMessageProcessor to create a new instance manually, entrely seprate from the MEF. using the MEF shared instance prulry as a list of types.

IMessageProcessor newInstance = (IMessageProcessor)Activator.CreateInstance(p.Value.GetType());

The full method;

public static IMessageProcessor GetMessageProcessor(MessageEnvelope messageEnvelope)
    {
        if (_instance == null)
            _instance = new MessageProsessorFactory();

        var p = _instance.Processors.FirstOrDefault(
                    s => s.Metadata.ExpectedType.AssemblyQualifiedName == messageEnvelope.AssemblyQualifiedName);

        if (p == null)
            throw new NotSupportedException(
                "The supplied type is not supported: " + messageEnvelope.AssemblyQualifiedName);

        // we need to create a new instance from the singleton instance provided by MEF to assure we get a instance un-associated with the MEF container for
        // currently as of .net 4.0 it wants to keep references on objects which may impact memory consumption.
        // As we have no control over how a developer will organise there class that exposes an Export,
        // this could lead to multithreading issues as an imported lazy instance is a singleton regardless 
        // of the RequiredCreationPolicy.
        // MEF is still invaluable in avoided a tone of abstract factory code and its dynamic detection of all supporting 
        // Exports conforming to IMessageProcessor means there is no factory config for us to maintain.

        IMessageProcessor newInstance = (IMessageProcessor)Activator.CreateInstance(p.Value.GetType());

        return newInstance;



    }
share|improve this question
    
Won't that approach fail if an IMessageProcessor instance has an ImportingConstructor instead of a default constructor? Also, it's not going to satisfy any imports on the new instance. –  Richard Deeming Dec 4 '12 at 19:22

1 Answer 1

Something like this should work:

public class MessageProsessorFactory
{
   private const string pluginFilenameFilter = "Connectors.*.dll";
   private static readonly Lazy<CompositionContainer> _container 
      = new Lazy<CompositionContainer>(CreateContainer, true);

   private static CompositionContainer CreateContainer()
   {
      RemoveDllSecurityZoneRestrictions();
      var catalog = new DirectoryCatalog(".", pluginFilenameFilter);
      return new CompositionContainer(catalog, true, null);
   }

   public static IMessageProcessor GetMessageProcessor(MessageEnvelope messageEnvelope)
   {
      var processors = _container.Value.GetExports<IMessageProcessor, IMessageProccessorExportMetadata>();
      var p = processors.FirstOrDefault(s => s.Metadata.ExpectedType.AssemblyQualifiedName == messageEnvelope.AssemblyQualifiedName);
      if (p == null) throw new NotSupportedException("The supplied type is not supported: " + messageEnvelope.AssemblyQualifiedName);
      return p.Value;
   }

   private static void RemoveDllSecurityZoneRestrictions()
   {
      // As before.
      // PS: Nice to see someone found a use for my code! :)
      // http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/2670/Accessing-alternative-data-streams-of-files-on-an
      ...
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I much prefer your all static method of instantiating the container using an alternate constructor in the Lazy<>. I think the jury is still out on what container.Value.GetExports will return, in terms of a new instance of a IMessageProcessor or a shared reference where MEF still maintains and expects you to notify that it can dispose of the instance when your done, resulting in a potential resource leak in my case as there is no come back, also it only gives us a reference to the same instance it holds on to internally, akin to a singleton. I read this is resolved in .Net 4.5 – –  dotNET Ninja Dec 17 '12 at 10:53
    
@Terry: So long as you have [PartCreationPolicy(CreationPolicy.NonShared)] on your exports, this approach will return a new instance of the exported class for each call to GetMessageProcessor. –  Richard Deeming Dec 17 '12 at 12:50
    
Apparently not, I have just found the same problem described here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3203614/… I assume this will still be a problem sadly. I found that the documentation does not make this clear at all. It still appears currently the only way to achieve this is by way of Activator.CreateInstance(part.getType) but apparently MEF will provide this soon .. blogs.msdn.com/b/nblumhardt/archive/2009/08/28/… –  dotNET Ninja Dec 17 '12 at 13:51
    
@Terry: The question you've linked to is equivalent to your original code - a static import of a list of Lazy<T, TMetadata> instances. Each Lazy<> instance will return the same exported value, but if you resolve the Lazy<> exports on each call, you'll get a different instance. I've tried this code in LINQPad, and each call to GetMessageProcessor returns a new instance. –  Richard Deeming Dec 17 '12 at 14:12
    
Ahh yes of course, I see. But then would I be asking MEF to reformulate all the parts on every call, which will be an order of magnitude slower than using it as merely a cached lookup and calling Activator.CreateInstance(). –  dotNET Ninja Dec 18 '12 at 9:50

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