Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am trying to put either an X or an O in an array. It doesn't seem to work, however. It says, "Run-Time Check Failure #2 - Stack around the variable 'row1' was corrupted."

char row1[19];
char row2[19];
char row3[19];
char row4[19];

for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++)
{
    int r = int(((double) rand() / (RAND_MAX)) + 1);

    if (r == 0)
    {
        row1[i] = 'X';
    }
    else
    {
        row1[i] = 'O';
    }

}

cout << row1[0] << endl;

How can I generate a random X or O? Thank you.

share|improve this question
7  
Not 20, but 19 in for (int i = 0; i < 19; i++). –  elmigranto Nov 20 '12 at 13:17
1  
@user1477388 the valid indices for int array[n]; are 0 to n-1. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 20 '12 at 13:19
1  
I just leave it here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero-based_numbering –  elmigranto Nov 20 '12 at 13:20
2  
No you're thinking too hard, row1[19] gives you 19. –  john Nov 20 '12 at 13:21
2  
@user1477388 Declaring an array row1[19] creates an array of 19 elements. These are accessible at indices 0 - 18. What you put in the brackets in array declaration is the number of elements of the array. –  Angew Nov 20 '12 at 13:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As elmigranto stated: your loop is incorrect. It should be:

for (int i = 0; i < 19; i++)

That is because char row4[19]; is an array that contains 19 elements. The first element is row4[0] and the last is row4[18] because the numbering is starts from 0. So in the last loop row[19] will cause an error.

share|improve this answer
    
Ahh, I see now. It just numbers to 18, not 19. I usually don't feel stupid after asking questions, but this one makes me feel dumb... –  user1477388 Nov 20 '12 at 13:25

If you want a coin flipping, you could do something like

char row1[20];
char row2[20];
char row3[20];
char row4[20];

for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++)
{
    int r = rand() % 2;

    if (r == 0)
    {
        row1[i] = 'X';
    }
    else
    {
        row1[i] = 'O';
    }

}

although I have no idea what row2 - row4 are for in your code. The stack corruption occurs with row1[19], since you specified 19 elements only, but 0..19 means 20 elements needed.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's so simple, and something I've done before. I didn't think to apply it here. Good call. –  user1477388 Nov 20 '12 at 13:24
const int arr_size = 19;
char row1[arr_size];

for (int i = 0; i < arr_size; ++i) {
    row1[i] = rand() % 2 ? 'O' : 'X';
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.