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What do you think is the best way to organise the CSS of a site?

I wanted to have ids followed by classes. However they are not exclusive.

Example:

h4 {
    padding: 5px 5px 5px 10px;	
    font-size: 110%;
    font-weight: bold;
    color: #000000;
    font-family: Arial,  Helvetica, sans-serif;
    margin: 0px 0px 5px 0px;
    background:transparent url(/images/example2.jpg) no-repeat scroll left top;
    text-transform: uppercase;
}
#rightcol {
    padding: 0px;
    width: 306px;
    overflow: hidden;
    float: left;
    margin: 0;
    border: 0;
}
#rightcol .container {
    margin: 5px 6px 0 0;
    padding: 5px 5px 0 5px;
    background: #FFFFFF;
}
#box_info {
   border: 1px solid #AAAAAA;
   background: #4F4F4F;
   line-height: normal;
   background: #4F4F4F url("../images/example.gif") repeat-x top left;
}
#box_info.container {
    margin: 10px 5px 10px 10px;
    background: transparent;
    padding: 0;
}

If there is a id infobox inside of a id right nav, the infobox's container will have the right nav's instead!

<div id="rightnav">
    <div class="advert">
      This needs to be here as sometimes I need it without borders margins etc.
    </div>
    <div class="container">
        <div id="otherbox">
            <div class="container">
            </div>
        </div>
        <div id="info_box">
            <h4>Related Info</h4>
            <div class="container">
                <span>Info in here</span>
            </div>
        </div>
        <div id="yetanotherbox">
            <div class="container">
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

So my question is: Is there a way to make them exclusive (or private if that is a better term) or a better way of organising CSS.

Cheers in advance.

edit: Just to let you know, I like putting containers in for the simple reason of width. I want 100% width but I also want to indent my containers. I find adding padding to the box then adding margin to the containers I get what I desire. If you can tell me how to do this with just one div, then go ahead although I just want a way of organising CSS better, not html (as I believe I am doing it the best it can be, but take a shot at proving me wrong :) ). Thank you :)

share|improve this question
1  
This probably isn't the best site to ask for help while saying "respect" my way of doing things. Your HTML is a mess and your CSS stuff is just a workaround as a result, you need half the DIVs you have. –  Mike McQuaid Aug 28 '09 at 14:41
1  
@Mike: I don't know- it's obviously a contrived example and not his real code. Just take it at face value and go with it. –  Joel Coehoorn Aug 28 '09 at 14:42
    
OK Mike i'll give you my layout and result and you can tell me how to do it better with half the divs. –  Dorjan Aug 28 '09 at 14:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your case when you want apply the #infobox .container styles you have to override the #rightnav .container with the "!important" rule. If you don't want any conflict between names, simply change, for example, the #rightnav .container in #rightnav .mainContainer. I hope I've written something not so obvious.

share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly the sort of examples I was looking for. Although I didn't want to go the route of loads of names. Since the way I do things I would have to call it #rightnav .rightnav_container etc etc which is what I wanted to avoid. Although I can see that might be the "best" aproch, unless Mike above can tell me how to fix my "mess" of HTML. –  Dorjan Aug 28 '09 at 14:50
    
I don't think your code is a mess. Again, I would change the name for the main container for no conflict and if the main container has some style to share with the others containers, you can set for both some common style. –  riotera Aug 28 '09 at 15:08
    
That is a good idea actually, as I wouldn't have two main containers for each area. so .outercontainer and then just .container would solve this issue, you're right. However I shall leave the question open a little longer to see if I get any other anwers, but you get a +1 :D (and most likely the correct answer tick) –  Dorjan Aug 28 '09 at 15:17
    
I hope you find the best solution :) –  riotera Aug 28 '09 at 15:19

I think Natalie Downe has the right approach to CSS organization, which she details in her CSS Systems presentation here:

http://natbat.net/2008/Sep/28/css-systems/

The idea is that you move from the more general to the more specific in several chunks:

  1. general styles
    • List item
    • body styles
    • reset
    • links
    • headings
    • other elements, tags
  2. helper styles
    • forms
    • notifications and errors
    • consistant items with normally just one class
  3. page structure
    • skeleton including page furniture
  4. page components
    • most of your styles will be in here
  5. overrides
    • as little as possible goes here
share|improve this answer
    
I'm reading through this now. :) –  Dorjan Sep 1 '09 at 10:26
    
Very interesting read, and I agree with it lots. However it doesn't touch on a solution to my particular problem (although does on other problems i've had) +1 –  Dorjan Sep 1 '09 at 11:40

I think trying to organize your cascade rules by class and id might be miss guided. You really should just be thinking of the actual cascade of things rather than trying to make them private.

For example the following:

 #container
    {
        width: 600px;
        margin: auto;
    }
    #left
    {
        width: 250px;
        float: left;
    }
    #left p
    {
        color: Blue;
    }
    #left .information p
    {
        font: normal .83em sans-serif;
        color: #000000;
    }
    #right
    {
        width: 250px;
        float: right;
    }
    #right ul
    {
        font: normal .83em sans-serif;
        list-style: none;
    }

Will show the this:

alt text

As you can see, there is no font face for the page itself. But as you dive deeper in the levels of the style cascade you will find that paragaphs have style defined and with the .information class you have a color blue defined on a paragraph. By thinking of what styles are needed as you dive deeper into your HTML you will see that you actually end up with less HTML and better organized style sheets.

Good luck and hope this helps.

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I wish I could give two correct answers as I asked two questions. –  Dorjan Sep 1 '09 at 10:03

One of the properties of cascading style sheets is that they cascade. Styles applied to parent elements also apply to their children. To change that, you will have to override the styles inherited from the parent by setting them again explicitly.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, I understand that, but can I not define the level of cascade? Like you can for tags like p.example or p#example but not #example.example? –  Dorjan Aug 28 '09 at 14:44

To target sub containers you could do #rightnav .container .container I think.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunatly this matches all other .containers inside #rightnav no matter how far down. It isn't one level. #rightnav .container will apply to all .containers inside a #rightnav no matter what the .container is nested in. –  Dorjan Aug 28 '09 at 14:48

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