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I was wondering if anyone would be able to help me out with regards to printing out a list of a custom class (first time using containers).

Currently I have a variable declared as:

std::list<Item> inventory;

within a class called player.

Now I have created a function within the class (player) called void printInventory();.

So my question is how do I go about printing what is in that list.

My Item class contains 3 variables;

std::string name; 
int damage;
int value;

I also have a function to print these variables void itemDetails();

Any help is much appreciated.

Edit:

I know have solved my problem with thanks to the answers provided, here's what i did:

Overloaded the output operator in the item class:

    ostream& operator<<(ostream& os, const Item& item)
    {
            if (item.getTypeInt() == 0)
            {
                    os << "Name: " << item.getName() << endl
                    << "Type: " << item.getTypeString() << endl
                    << "Damage: " << item.getDamage()<< endl
                    << "Value: " << item.getValue() << endl;
            }
            else
            {
            os << "Name: " << item.getName() << endl
            << "Type: " << item.getTypeString() << endl
            << "HP: " << item.getHP()<< endl
            << "Value: " << item.getValue() << endl;
    }

    return os;
    }

I then used one of the answers but modified it so it wasn't declaring another variable:

    void Player::printInventory()
    {   
        for(std::list<Item>::iterator it = inventory.begin(); it!= inventory.end(); ++it)
        {
                cout << *it;
        }

        cout <<"Inventroy Printed!!"<<endl;
    }
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closed as not a real question by Jan Hudec, Juraj Blaho, Mark, Konstantin D - Infragistics, Linus Kleen Nov 22 '12 at 15:20

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
What have you tried? –  Jan Hudec Nov 20 '12 at 13:21
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should overload std::ostream& operator<< for Item and player, this will allow you to write the data to streams other than stdout. Here's an example:

std::ostream& ooprator<<(std::ostream& os, const Item& item)
{
  return os << "Item {" << item.name << " " << item.damage << " " << item.value << "}";
}

This allows you to do

Item i;
std::cout << i << "\n";

Then, you implement a similar operator for player, looping over the list and printing each item.

std::ostream& ooprator<<(std::ostream& os, const player& p)
  for (const auto& i : p.inventory) os << i << " "
  return os;
}
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1  
+1 for using auto and range for –  Eric B Nov 20 '12 at 13:34
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you already had a list of items in inventory. Iterate through it and call itemDetails

void printInventory()
{
  for(std::list<Item>::iterator it = inventory.begin(); it!= inventory.end(); ++it)
  {
    Item item = *it;
    item.itemDetails();
  }
}

This will do the job.

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Take a look at std::for_each together with std::mem_fun. The MSDN has a nice example. Alternatively, you can always roll out your own loop, calling the member function directly.

I have no compiler on my hands, but something like this should do the trick:

std::for_each(inventory.begin(), inventory.end(), std::mem_fun<Item>(&Item::printInventory));
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It's a simple for loop

for (std::list<Item>::iterator i = inventory.begin(); i != inventory.end(); ++i)
    i->itemDetails();

There are other ways, but this is how I'd do it.

itemDetails is not a very good name for your method. Maybe printDetails?

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You can overload the operator << so you'll be able to output an Item through standard output. You can find some examples here.

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'overlap', I like it! But the technically correct term is overload. –  john Nov 20 '12 at 13:24
    
Ooooops! I had other things in my mind... Edited, thanks! –  Genís Nov 20 '12 at 13:26
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