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I got an elegant answer yesterday for my question regarding polymorphic object members.

But now I am facing the problem that the variable isn't really behaving the way I expected it to. The following code is being used:

#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>

using std::cin;
using std::cout;
using std::endl;


class Com
{
    public:
        virtual void setReady()
        {
            cout << "Com" << endl;
        }
};

class DerivedCom : public Com
{
    public:
        void setReady()
        {
            cout << "DCom" << endl;
        }

        void somethingElse()
        {
            cout << "else" << endl;
        }

};

class BaseClass
{
    public:
        Com* com;

    public:
        BaseClass(Com* c = new Com) : com(c)
        {
        }

        virtual void setReady()
        {
            com->setReady();
        }
};

class DerivedClass : public BaseClass
{
    // the call to somethingElse() won't compile if I leave out this declaration
    protected:
        DerivedCom* com;

    public:
        DerivedClass() : BaseClass(new DerivedCom) 
        {
        }

        void setReady()
        {
            // This line causes a segfault if I put in the declaration earlier
            this->com->setReady();

            // This line won't compile if I leave out the declaration earlier
            this->com->somethingElse();
        }
};

int main()
{
    DerivedClass* inst = new DerivedClass();

    inst->setReady();
    return 0;
}

The problem is, that DerivedClass::com is in fact of type DerivedCom but I can't access any DerivedCom-specific methods as the compiler won't find them. If I put in an extra re-declaration DerivedCom* com, the compiler will find the methods but I get segmentation faults.

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Nowhere in this code do I see a virtual dtor which is essential if you want cascading dtor calls when you call delete on base class. –  nurettin Nov 20 '12 at 13:58
    
This is just a proof of concept. I figured I didn't need dtors. –  Nils Werner Nov 20 '12 at 13:59
    
well, [polymorphism] tag without at least virtual ~Com{} looks pretty weird. –  nurettin Nov 20 '12 at 14:03
    
@NilsWerner: This was already mentioned in the comments of the original question (in particular the third comment to the question). –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 20 '12 at 14:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Remove that extra declaration.

If you are sure that a Com* is a DerivedCom* then you can static_cast it.

static_cast<DerivedCom*>(this->com)->somethingElse();

This will likely crash it you're wrong however. So if you are not sure then you can dynamic_cast it

DerivedCom* dcom = dynamic_cast<DerivedCom*>(this->com);
if (dcom)
    dcom->somethingElse();

dynamic_cast will return NULL if the object isn't of the type you asked for.

share|improve this answer
    
It works, interesting! Is there any way to make the static cast once and then simply use this->com in the rest of the class? –  Nils Werner Nov 20 '12 at 13:50
    
no, the static-cast pointer you're making is locally scoped. You'd have to keep that redeclaration to be able to use this->com at all places in the class –  Eric B Nov 20 '12 at 13:52
1  
Sure just declare a member variable (but called something different from com) and initialise it in your constructor. But I think I would rather static_cast it each time, it's not good to duplicate information. –  john Nov 20 '12 at 13:53
    
Like... declaring DerivedCom* com and executing this->com = static_cast<DerivedCom*>(BaseClass::com); in the constructor. Or is that just an ugly hack? –  Nils Werner Nov 20 '12 at 13:53
1  
Provided you own the code, you could also add a stub (an empty body) implementation of somethingElse() to BaseClass, or declare somethingElse() pure-virtual in BaseClass. –  WhozCraig Nov 20 '12 at 13:58

The reason for the segmentation faults is that you arent declaring the variable again with a different type, you are actually defining a new pointer in the derived class, one that is never initialized. Thus this->com->... will access the derived class com and crash since it is an uninitialized pointer.

What you are trying to do though, is to change the type of the member pointer. You could do that by making the type of the member pointer as a template variable, as follows

template <class ComType>
class BaseClassTemplate
{
    ComType* com;
    ...;
};

typedef BaseClassTemplate<Com> BaseClass;

class DerivedClass : public BaseClassTemplate<DerivedCom>
{
    ...;
};

However this makes the base class a template, so to get it as you want it, you need to make an instantiation of BaseClass<Com> to get your version of base class. You can either make it a derived class or just a typedef as i have shown.

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