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A book I am reading on Java tells me that the following two pieces of code are equivalent:

public <T extends Animal> void takeThing(ArrayList<T> list)

public void takeThing(ArrayList<? extends Animal> list);

On the opposite page, I am informed that the latter piece of code uses the '?' as a wildcard, meaning that nothing can be added to the list.

Does this mean that if I ever have a list (or other collection types?) that I can't make them simultaneously accept polymorphic arguments AND be re-sizable? Or have I simply misunderstood something?

All help/comments appreciated, even if they go slightly off topic. Thanks.

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Nothing can be added to list in either case because you didn't specify the lower bound. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 20 '12 at 13:59
    
Its only the case with extends. If you use super, you can add elements to that list. But in that case, you can pass a list of super types only. –  Rohit Jain Nov 20 '12 at 14:00
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Technically you can add null in both cases. –  arshajii Nov 20 '12 at 14:02
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@MarkoTopolnik Something can be added in either case. null for one, but one can also add duplicates of possibly existing elements. To do that for the second case one merely has to capture the wildcard. I'm constantly amazed at the lack of awareness when it comes to wildcard capture. –  Ben Schulz Nov 20 '12 at 14:09
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@Jesper You could call the first method from the second method (assuming they do not clash). That would capture the wildcard as T. –  Ben Schulz Nov 20 '12 at 14:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Does this mean that if I ever have a list (or other collection types?) that I can't make them simultaneously accept polymorphic arguments AND be re-sizable?

No.

The two pieces of code are not completely equivalent. In the first line, the method takeThing has a type parameter T. In the second line, you're using a wildcard.

When you would use the first version, you would specify what concrete type would be used for T. Because the concrete type is then known, there's no problem to add to the list.

In the second version, you're just saying "list is an ArrayList that contains objects of some unknown type that extends Animal". What exactly that type is, isn't known. You can't add objects to such a list because the compiler doesn't have enough information (it doesn't know what the actual type is) to check if what you're adding to the list should be allowed.

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Notice <T extends Animal> in the declaration of first method. We can't add a new value in that list. If of course the new value is not null. –  Rohit Jain Nov 20 '12 at 14:06
    
@RohitJain But that's by itself not a reason why you can't add anything to the list. The problem would be where you'd get the T object from to add to the list. –  Jesper Nov 20 '12 at 14:10
    
For example, this works without a problem: public <T extends Animal> void takeThing(ArrayList<T> list, T e) { list.add(e); } –  Jesper Nov 20 '12 at 14:10
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@Jesper.. But if you are adding a new element created inside that method, then well, you won't be able to add. –  Rohit Jain Nov 20 '12 at 14:14
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"When you would use the first version, you would specify what concrete type would be used for T. Because the concrete type is then known, there's no problem to add to the list." This doesn't make sense. The chosen type argument is only known in the caller's scope. But when you're talking about adding to the list, that's inside the function, so you don't know what T is, and it could be anything. –  newacct Nov 20 '12 at 19:18

Usually, if adding to a list is involved inside a method that accepts just the list without the thing to add, you'll have somewhere else something that is an Animal and you'll want to add it to the list. In this case your method must be declared so that all the list types it accepts allow adding an Animal into them. This will have to be a List<Animal> or a list of some supertype of Animal. It can't possibly be a List<Dog>— the element you are adding could be any Animal.

This is where the concept of the lower bound, and the keyword super, come in. The type declaration List<? super Animal> matches all the acceptable types as described above. On the other hand, you won't be able to get elements out of such a list in a typesafe way because they can in general be of any type at all. If a method wants to both add and get elements of declared type Animal, the only valid type it can accept is a List<Animal>.

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