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I would like to expand the following data frame

d <- data.frame(a = c(rep("A",5),rep("B",5),rep("C",3),rep("D",2)))

> d
   a
1  A
2  A
3  A
4  A
5  A
6  B
7  B
8  B
9  B
10 B
11 C
12 C
13 C
14 D
15 D

so that there is a column b looking like:

> d
   a b
1  A 1
2  A 1
3  A 1
4  A 1
5  A 1
6  B 2 
7  B 2 
8  B 2
9  B 2
10 B 2
11 C 3
12 C 3
13 C 3
14 D 4
15 D 4

Not really sure how to realise that.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use match:

match(d$a, unique(d$a))
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works too. great! :) –  user969113 Nov 20 '12 at 14:13
    
Clever. I like this better too. –  Josh O'Brien Nov 20 '12 at 14:47
    
@JoshO'Brien it's essentially exactly what your solution does under the covers –  hadley Nov 20 '12 at 16:23
d$b <- as.integer(factor(d$a, levels=unique(d$a)))
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+1 Remind me next time to first post the code, then edit and add the results! PS. You can simplify this to as.integer(factor(d$a)) –  Andrie Nov 20 '12 at 14:06
    
hello, that works but only partially. If one swaps around B and D for instance, then D still gets the number 4 but should get two instead. My example was probably not very good as the letters A to D are in alphabetical order. sorry –  user969113 Nov 20 '12 at 14:07
    
@user969113 See my edit, which should work with any ordering of the letters. –  Josh O'Brien Nov 20 '12 at 14:10
    
yes that works now. thanks! –  user969113 Nov 20 '12 at 14:12
1  
Hey, @Andrie. Remember: next time, first post code and then edit and add results =) –  Josh O'Brien Nov 20 '12 at 14:37

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