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I want to execute the following two functions at exactly the same time.

from multiprocessing import Process
import os
import datetime

def func_1(title):
    now = datetime.datetime.now()
    print "hello, world"
    print "Current second: %d" % now.second
    print "Current microsecond: %d" % now.microsecond

def func_2(name):
    func_1('function func_2')
    now = datetime.datetime.now()
    print "Bye, world"
    print "Current second: %d" % now.second
    print "Current microsecond: %d" % now.microsecond

if __name__ == '__main__':
    p = Process(target=func_2, args=('bob',))
    p.start()
    p.join()

And I am getting a difference in microseconds. Is there any way to execute both at the exact same time? Any help would be appreciated.

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2  
The exact same time is theoretically impossible - the question is how big your error margin is allowed to be. In your case I guess you want to start them at the same microsecond? –  l4mpi Nov 20 '12 at 14:20
    
I don't like answers like that, so it's just a comment, but I think that on systems popular on the planet Earth these days it is, unfortunately, not possible. –  piokuc Nov 20 '12 at 14:22
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4 Answers

This is (1) generally impossible (the 'exact' part) and (2) not something that python is good at - if you really need microsecond execution precision, use C or ASM. But an even closer way than COpythons answer would be busy-waiting in two different processes for an agreed start time:

from multiprocessing import Process
import os
import datetime
from time import time

def func_1(title):
    now = datetime.datetime.now()
    print "hello, world"
    print "Current second: %d" % now.second
    print "Current microsecond: %d" % now.microsecond

def func_2(name):
    now = datetime.datetime.now()
    print "Bye, world"
    print "Current second: %d" % now.second
    print "Current microsecond: %d" % now.microsecond

def start_f1(name):
    while time() < start_time: pass
    func_1(name)

def start_f2(name):
    while time() < start_time: pass
    func_2(name)        

if __name__ == '__main__':
    procs = []
    procs.append(Process(target=start_f2, args=('bob',)))
    procs.append(Process(target=start_f1, args=('sir',)))
    start_time = time() + 10
    map(lambda x: x.start(), procs)
    map(lambda x: x.join(), procs)
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On the computer the following was written on, this code consistently prints out the same timestamps:

#! /usr/bin/env python3
from multiprocessing import Barrier, Lock, Process
from time import time
from datetime import datetime

def main():
    synchronizer = Barrier(2)
    serializer = Lock()
    Process(target=test, args=(synchronizer, serializer)).start()
    Process(target=test, args=(synchronizer, serializer)).start()

def test(synchronizer, serializer):
    synchronizer.wait()
    now = time()
    with serializer:
        print(datetime.fromtimestamp(now))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()
share|improve this answer
    
I am getting this error,ImportError: cannot import name Barrier and i am new to this threading i tried to import Barrier could not get it. i think that is not a inbuilt package –  Vishruth Nov 22 '12 at 7:36
    
@Mr.Calm: Try using the latest release of Python (version 3.3) to use Barrier. –  Noctis Skytower Nov 22 '12 at 13:15
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not sure if this will execute at exactly the same time, but I think it will get you closer.

from multiprocessing import Process
import os
import datetime

def func_1(title):
    now = datetime.datetime.now()
    print "hello, world"
    print "Current second: %d" % now.second
    print "Current microsecond: %d" % now.microsecond

def func_2(name):
    now = datetime.datetime.now()
    print "Bye, world"
    print "Current second: %d" % now.second
    print "Current microsecond: %d" % now.microsecond

if __name__ == '__main__':
    procs = []
    procs.append(Process(target=func_2, args=('bob',)))
    procs.append(Process(target=func_1, args=('sir',)))
    map(lambda x: x.start(), procs)
    map(lambda x: x.join(), procs)
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I believe this is about as close as you can get in standard CPython without doing some sort of "real-time" extension. –  apiguy Nov 20 '12 at 14:25
    
@COpython Sorry still there is 400ms diff. –  Vishruth Nov 20 '12 at 14:25
    
@Mr.Calm, you could put both of your functions in a class, and get now in the constructor, then both functions would have the same timestamp... no other way to get it closer than that :-/ –  Cameron Sparr Nov 20 '12 at 14:32
    
@COpython that's working only 25ms diff thank you, –  Vishruth Nov 23 '12 at 15:42
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CPythonis inherently single threaded (Google "Global Interpreter Lock"). To have even a theoretical chance you would need a multicore processor, but even then only an operating system operating at a very low level could do it and even then you would need special hardware.. What you are asking for is, in any practical sense, impossible.

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The question specifically mentions the multiprocessing module which sidesteps the GIL, so this part of your answer is invalid... –  l4mpi Nov 20 '12 at 17:25
    
Maybe the GIL part is invalid, but the multiprocessing module relies on the OS scheduler, which will schedule in software and sequentually. You would need two processors that react to the same hardware interrupt which you aren't going to get without custom hardware. –  James Thiele Nov 20 '12 at 19:02
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