Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have some private variables (say int a, int b, int c) inside my class. Due to some internal manipulations I need to set/get such variables in a thread safe way so I used some wrapping getters/setters and used a scoped mutex.

void setA(int a)
{
    unique_lock<mutex> lock(opMutex);

    this->a = a;
}

void getA(int a)
{
    unique_lock<mutex> lock(opMutex);

    return a;
}

void setB(int b)
{
    unique_lock<mutex> lock(opMutex);

    this->b = b;
}

void setC(int c)
{
    unique_lock<mutex> lock(opMutex);

    this->c = c;
}

My question is: is it possbile to avoid getter/setter methods (public variables) and keep thread safety on assign/read operations over such variables?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is a similar library in Boost, boost::atomic but it's not yet included in the standard AFAIK.

share|improve this answer

If you move your thread security synchronization code outside the getters setters, and bloat your code with boilerplate code locking mutexes everywhere, yes it's possible not to use getter and setters, but it would be really counter-productive.

share|improve this answer

If C++11 is an option, consider using std::atomic_store and std::atomic_load with atomic_int. However, you probably should still stay with getters/setters, so your decisions on how you manage your data (e.g., the choice between atomics and mutexes) won't affect the class users, even if that's only you :)

If C++11 is not an option, you can use one of the C++98 compatible implementations of atomic operations out there. I've used the proposed boost atomic library for quite some time and there are other implementations roaming the Internets.

share|improve this answer
    
it's ok but I've got to work with the plain old C++98 standard –  G_G Nov 20 '12 at 14:53
    
There is some work-in-progress towards Boost.Atomic git.chaoticmind.net/cgi-bin/cgit.cgi/boost.atomic –  chill Nov 20 '12 at 15:14

You can use std::atomic<int> a, b, c;

PS. Ugh, I didn't see the boost tag, so I thought you're talking C++11 ...

share|improve this answer
    
interesting, does the atomic type redefines the assign operator in a thread safe one? –  G_G Nov 20 '12 at 14:50
    
does it work only for base types? –  G_G Nov 20 '12 at 14:51
    
+1: didn't know that type, great to speak about it –  Stephane Rolland Nov 20 '12 at 14:51
    
@chill: nope, just vanilla C++98 standard + boost lib –  G_G Nov 20 '12 at 14:55
    
@G_G A number of specializations are supplied by the standard library. You can use "value semantics" to access and set the atomic value so it is used much like a normal int. The standard library is actually free to not use a lock when it knows the variable is properly aligned that data type can be set/accessed atomically on the architecture. Take a look here for the atomic types the C++11 standard library provides you: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/atomic/atomic –  Sean Cline Nov 20 '12 at 15:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.