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I have a SQLAlchemy query which is iterable, let's say it's an object called query. When you iterate over it you get items like this:

Table1('Column1', 'Column2')

When you join tables on the query object and then iterate over it, you get tuples instead:

(Table1('Column1', 'Column2'), Table2('Column3', 'Column4'))

I know I can use a generator to iterate over the query object, like this:

(each[0] for each in query)

But this doesn't preserve any of the other methods on object query, it turns it into a generator object. Is there an easy way to change the behavior of the iteration part of query while leaving the rest of the methods alone?

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Not really. Query objects are designed to be sorta-kinda immutable, so that you can use the same "stem" query to produce two different ones. –  wberry Nov 20 '12 at 15:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I figured it out, I just needed to use __getattr__ to forward access to another object, and define __iter__ with the new functionality. This worked with SQLAlchemy as long as I didn't call any other methods to extend the query, which would have created a new object without these changes. I managed to avoid that by wrapping the object right before I planned to iterate over it.

class X:
    def __init__(self):
        self.prop1 = "prop1"

    def __iter__(self):
        yield 1
        yield 2
        yield 3

    def method(self):
        print "method 1"

class Y:
    def __init__(self):
        self.prop2 = "prop2"

    def __iter__(self):
        yield (1,2)
        yield (3,4)
        yield (5,6)

    def another_method(self):
        print "method 2"

class FirstInTuple:
    def __init__(self, obj):
        self.obj = obj

    def __getattr__(self, attr):
        return getattr(self.obj, attr)

    def __iter__(self):
        for each in self.obj:
            if hasattr(each, '__getitem__'):
                yield each[0]
            else:
                yield each

if __name__ == "__main__":
    x = X()
    y = Y()
    f_x = FirstInTuple(x)
    f_y = FirstInTuple(y)

    for each in x:
        print each
    print
    for each in y:
        print each
    print
    for each in f_x:
        print each
    print
    for each in f_y:
        print each
    print
    print f_x.prop1
    f_x.method()
    print
    print f_y.prop2
    f_y.another_method()

Output:

1
2
3

(1, 2)
(3, 4)
(5, 6)

1
2
3

1
3
5

prop1
method 1

prop2
method 2
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