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I have a Thread (STAThread) in a Windows Service, which performs a big amount of work. When the windows service is restarted I want to stop this thread gracefully.

I know of a couple of ways

  • A volatile boolean
  • ManualResetEvent
  • CancellationToken

As far as I have found out Thread.Abort is a no go...

What is the best practice ? The work is perfomed in another class than the one where the thread is started, so it is necessary to either introduce a cancellationToken parameter in a constructor or for example have a volatile variable. But I just can't figure out what is smartest.

Update
Just to clarify a little I have wrapped up a very simple example of what I'm talking about. As said earlier, this is being done in a windows service. Right now I'm thinking a volatile boolean that is checked on in the loop or a cancellationToken.... I cannot wait for the loop to finish, as stated below it can take several minutes, making the system administrators of the server believe that something is wrong with the service when they need to restart it.... I can without problems just drop all the work within the loop without problems, however I cannot do this with a Thread.Abort it is "evil" and furthermore a COM interface is called, so a small clean up is needed.

Class Scheduler{
  private Thread apartmentThread;
  private Worker worker;

  void Scheduling(){
    worker = new Worker();
    apartmentThread = new Thread(Run);
    apartmentThread.SetApartmentState(ApartmentState.STA);
    apartmentThread.Start();    
  }

  private void Run() {
    while (!token.IsCancellationRequested) {
      Thread.Sleep(pollInterval * MillisecondsToSeconds);
      if (!token.IsCancellationRequested) {
        worker.DoWork();
      }
    }
  }
}

Class Worker{
  //This will take several minutes....
  public void DoWork(){
    for(int i = 0; i < 50000; i++){
      //Do some work including communication with a COM interface
      //Communication with COM interface doesn't take long
    }
  }
}

UPDATE
Just examined performance, using a cancellationToken where the isCancelled state is "examined" in the code, is much faster than using a waitOne on a ManualResetEventSlim. Some quick figuers, an if on the cancellationToken iterating 100.000.000 times in a for loop costs me approx. 500 ms, where the WaitOne costs approx. 3 seconds. So performance in this scenario it is faster to use the cancellationToken.

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2  
have a look at related question about reset event and volatile stackoverflow.com/questions/11953234/… I personnally normally use ManualResetEvent for your case, for it's something provided by the system specifically for this kind of tasks. –  Maxim Zabolotskikh Nov 20 '12 at 15:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You haven't posted enough of your implementation but I would highly recommend a CancellationToken if that is available to you. It's simple enough to use and understand from a maintainability standpoint. You can setup cooperative cancellation as well too if you decide to have more than one worker thread.

If you find yourself in a situation where this thread may block for long periods of time, it's best to setup your architecture so that this doesn't occur. You shouldn't be starting threads that won't play nice when you tell them to stop. If they don't stop when you ask them, the only real way is to tear down the process and let the OS kill them.

Eric Lippert posted a fantastic answer to a somewhat-related question here.

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As mentioned above in my latest update, I found out performance wise that it was best to use the CancellationToken... –  dennis_ler Nov 21 '12 at 14:47

I tend to use a bool flag, a lock object and a Terminate() method, such as:

object locker = new object();
bool do_term = false;

Thread thread = new Thread(ThreadStart(ThreadProc));
thread.Start();

void ThreadProc()
{
    while (true) {
        lock (locker) {
            if (do_term) break;
        }

        ... do work...
    }
}

void Terminate()
{
    lock (locker) {
        do_term = true;
    }
}

Asides from Terminate() all the other fields and methods are private to the "worker" class.

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I'd suggest marking the bool as volatile. –  Matt Davis Nov 20 '12 at 16:13
    
That's true it would negate the need for lock. –  Lloyd Nov 20 '12 at 16:20

There are two situations in which you may find your thread:

  • Processing.
  • Blocking.

In the case where your thread is processing something, you must wait for your thread to finish processing in order for it to safely exit. If it's part of a work loop, then you can use a boolean flag to terminate the loop.

In the case where your thread is blocking, then you need to wake your thread and get it processing again. A thread may be blocking on a ManualResetEvent, a database call, a socket call or whatever else you could block on. In order to wake it up, you must call the Thread.Interrupt() method which will raise a ThreadInterruptedException.

It may look something like this:

private object sync = new object():
private bool running = false;

private void Run()
{
    running = true;
    while(true)
    {
        try
        {
            lock(sync)
            {
                if(!running)
                {
                    break;
                }
            }

            BlockingFunction();
        }
        catch(ThreadInterruptedException)
        {
            break;
        }
    }
}

public void Stop()
{
    lock(sync)
    {
        running = false;
    }
}

And here is how you can use it:

MyRunner r = new MyRunner();
Thread t = new Thread(()=>
{
    r.Run();
});

t.IsBackground = true;
t.Start();

// To stop the thread
r.Stop();

// Interrupt the thread if it's in a blocking state
t.Interrupt();

// Wait for the thread to exit
t.Join();
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Use a WaitHandle, most preferably a ManualResetEvent. Your best bet is to let whatever is in your loop finish. This is the safest way to accomplish your goal.

ManualResetEvent _stopSignal = new ManualResetEvent(false); // Your "stopper"
ManualResetEvent _exitedSignal = new ManualResetEvent(false);

void DoProcessing() {
    try {
        while (!_stopSignal.WaitOne(0)) {
            DoSomething();
        }
    }
    finally {
        _exitedSignal.Set();
    }
}

void DoSomething() {
    //Some work goes here
}

public void Terminate() {
    _stopSignal.Set();
    _exitedSignal.WaitOne();
}

Then to use it:

Thread thread = new Thread(() => { thing.DoProcessing(); });
thread.Start();

//Some time later...
thing.Terminate();

If you have a particularly long-running process in your "DoSomething" implementation, you may want to call that asynchronously, and provide it with state information. That can get pretty complicated, though -- better to just wait until your process is finished, then exit, if you are able.

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This would be a good way to do it, however wouldn't it be a problem that my thread doing the DoProcessing is a STAThread ? –  dennis_ler Nov 21 '12 at 9:06
    
It shouldn't be a problem. (at least it wasn't when I ran it) –  Sean H Nov 21 '12 at 15:06

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