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I have two tables. One table (A) has n rows of data and the other table (B) is empty. I want to insert n rows into table B, 1 row for each row in table A. Table B will have a couple of fields from table A in it, including a foreign key from table A. In the end I want one row in B for each row in A. To do this I used

INSERT INTO B
           ([Col1]
           ,[Col2]
           ,[Col3]
           ,[Col4]
           ,[Col5])
     SELECT 
        100, 
        25, 
        'ABC',
                1,
        A.ID
     FROM Auctions A

Now, I've put this code in a stored procedure and this SP takes an int param called NumInserts. I want to insert n*NumInsert rows. So, if n is 10 and NumInserts is 5 I want to run this code 5 * 10 (50) times. In other words for each row in table A I want to insert 5 rows in B. How would I do that?

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2  
I would set up a number table that has numbers from 1 to a large upper bound (1,000,000 or something). Then you could CROSS APPLY Auctions to the numbers table where Number <= NumInserts. The results if n was 10 would be each row duplicated 5 times before being inserted into B. –  Cᴏʀʏ Nov 20 '12 at 15:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
create procedure insert_into_b
    @numInserts int
as
begin
    while @numInserts > 0
    begin
        insert into b (id)
        select id from a
        set @numInserts = @numInserts - 1
    end
end

exec insert_into_b 2
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I prefer to avoid looping when I can, just so I don't have to maintain some easily breakable and somewhat ugly loop structure in my stored procedure.

You could easily do this with a Numbers table, the CROSS APPLY statement, and your existing INSERT statement.

Given that your numbers table would look like this:

Number
======
0
1
2
...

Your SQL statement simply becomes:

INSERT INTO B 
(
    [Col1]
    ,[Col2]
    ,[Col3]
    ,[Col4]
    ,[Col5]
)
SELECT 
    100 
    ,25
    ,'ABC'
    ,1
    ,a.ID
FROM 
    Auctions a
CROSS APPLY
    Numbers n
WHERE
    n.Number BETWEEN 1 AND @NumInserts

Numbers tables can be useful if use appropriately. If you're unfamiliar with them, here are a few resources and some pros/cons:

Maybe this solution is overkill if @NumInserts is always going to be a reasonably small number, but if you already have a Numbers table sitting around, you might as well take advantage of it!

UPDATE:

Here's a quick and dirty method to populate a numbers table from 0 to 65,535:

CREATE TABLE Numbers
(
    Number INT NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT PK_Numbers 
        PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (Number)
        WITH FILLFACTOR = 100
)
GO

INSERT INTO Numbers
SELECT
    (a.Number * 256) + b.Number AS Number
FROM 
(
    SELECT number
    FROM master..spt_values
    WHERE 
        type = 'P'
        AND number <= 255
) a (Number),
(
    SELECT number
    FROM master..spt_values
    WHERE 
        type = 'P'
        AND number <= 255
) b (Number)
GO

Credit: http://sqlblog.com/blogs/adam_machanic/archive/2006/07/12/you-require-a-numbers-table.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
This is good. I think I might use this next time I have this problem. I bet there is a quick and easy way to populate the numbers table too. –  Sachin Kainth Nov 20 '12 at 15:56
    
@downvoter: Any reason why? –  Cᴏʀʏ Nov 20 '12 at 16:03
    
@SachinKainth: I updated my answer with a quick and dirty method to get a small numbers table. –  Cᴏʀʏ Nov 20 '12 at 16:03
    
I down voted. I disagree with tables to hold things like dates, numbers etc. Once I even saw one that had only two rows, (True, and False). Rather than use a table to store numbers, if you want to avoid the loop, use a CTE. (and why try to avoid loop? - no matter WHAT you do the computer MUST be looping somewhere. the only difference is at what level of abstraction the loop is mechanized!!) –  Charles Bretana Nov 20 '12 at 16:04
    
@CharlesBretana: I agree that somewhere there is a loop; my argument is: why should I bother maintaining the ugly looping code when I could just add a few extra instructions in my already-existing query? –  Cᴏʀʏ Nov 20 '12 at 16:07

This is a hack and I wouldn't recommend using it in production or big volumes of data. However, in development quick-and-dirty scenarios I found it often useful:

Use GO \[count\] to execute a batch of commands a specified number of times.

Concretely, if you had a stored procedure called InsertAIntoB, you could run this in Management Studio:

exec InsertAIntoB
GO 10

(replace 10 with whatever NumInserts is)

share|improve this answer
    
A nick hack - in fact I am using it for a quick and dirty scenario. For some reason GO @NumInserts didn't work - I wonder how the escaping helps. –  Sachin Kainth Nov 20 '12 at 15:58
1  
@SachinKainth Actually I don't think it works with variables. That's because GO <n> is not really T-SQL, but some sort of macro that SQL Server Management Studio understands. –  w0lf Nov 20 '12 at 16:00
 Create procedure DoitNTimes 
 @N integer = 1
 As
 Set NoCount On

    While @N > 0 Begin
       Insert B (Col1, Col2, Col3, Col4, Col5)
       Select 100, 25, 'ABC', 1, A.ID
       From Auctions A
       -- -----------------------------------
       Set @N -= 1
    End

If using SQL Server 2005 or earlier replace the Set @N -= 1' withSet @N = @N-1`

and if you really want to avoid loop using T-SQL variables, then use a CTE, not a disk-based table:

 Create procedure DoitNTimes 
 @N integer = 1
 As
 Set NoCount On

     With nums(num) As
       (Select @N Union All
        Select num - 1
        From nums
        Where num > 1)
     Insert B (Col1, Col2, Col3, Col4, Col5)
     Select 100, 25, 'ABC', 1, A.ID
     From Auctions A Full Join nums
     Option(MaxRecursion 10000) 

but of course, this is also still looping, just like any solution to this issue.

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