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So I have a class:

public class Person
{
    public string Firstname { get; set; }
    public string Lastname { get; set; }

    public Person()
    {
        AddPerson();
    }

    private void AddPerson()
    {
        string fn = this.Firstname;
        string ln = this.Lastname;
        // Do something with these values
        // Probably involves adding to a database
    }

}

And I have some code that will instantiate an object and add it to the database, returning the the object of type Person:

Person me = new Person()
{
    Firstname = "Piers",
    Lastname = "Karsenbarg"
};

However, when I debug this, and get to the AddPerson() method, the properties this.Firstname and this.Lastname don't have anything in them (in this case are empty).

Where am I going wrong?

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1  
"Where am I going wrong?" - you're making your constructor do more work than bringing the object in a usable state. If AddPerson adds a person to a database, it is discutable that that is a Person method, but if it is required at that point, it should be public and named appropriately (AddPersonToDatabase) and should never be called automatically, let alone from the constructor. –  CodeCaster Nov 20 '12 at 16:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is because properties are assigned after constructor is called. Basicaly, this:

Person me = new Person()
{
    Firstname = "Piers",
    Lastname = "Karsenbarg"
};

is the same as:

Person me = new Person();
me.Firstname = "Piers";
me.Lastname = "Karsenbarg";

Only difference here is syntax. In your case you may want to pass those variables via parametrized constructor (new Person("Piers", "Karsenbarg")).

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How would you recommend doing this then? Maybe just have another method that does the adding after? So instantiate the new object and then call me.Save() that would run the save method (which would probably do the same as the AddPerson() method, just be public instead? –  Piers Karsenbarg Nov 20 '12 at 16:18
    
Just seen your update. I do have a parameterized constructor, but I was wondering the best way of doing it. –  Piers Karsenbarg Nov 20 '12 at 16:19
    
There are couple ways, it depends on what you need. I've recommended parametrized constructor for this (based on what I see in your question). –  walkhard Nov 20 '12 at 16:21

You have not assigned any values to your properties. I would suggest passing in the names you want in the constructor:

   public class Person
{
    public string Firstname { get; set; }
    public string Lastname { get; set; }

    public Person(string firstname, lastname)
    {
        this.Firstname = firstname;
        this.Lastname = lastname;
        AddPerson();
    }

    private void AddPerson()
    {
        string fn = this.Firstname;
        string ln = this.Lastname;
        // Do something with these values
        // Probably involves adding to a database
    }

}

A person cannot exist without a firstname or lastname so this makes logical sense

share|improve this answer
1  
"A person cannot exist without a firstname or lastname" - it might be nitpicking given the application constraints, but: Falsehoods Programmers Believe About Names. –  CodeCaster Nov 20 '12 at 16:26
    
@CodeCaster interesting article - thanks for that! –  Liath Nov 20 '12 at 16:31

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