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I am a bit stuck with some code. I have to use the return type of the method getToto() which usually returns a std::string, but in one case it returns false (It is part of a library I have to use, I cannot modify it). I understand that is equivalent to a null pointer. But I cannot find a proper way to catch it!

Test.cpp

static std::string getToto(){
 char buffer[1024];
 if ( CTX_Get_Env(buffer, "Toto", 1024) )
    return false;
 return buffer;
}

If I try

const char* returned = Test::getToto().c_str();
if (returned==NULL){
    std::cout<< "null pointer"<<std::endl;
}

I get an error whilst running

terminate called after throwing an instance of 'std::logic_error'

what(): basic_string::_S_construct NULL not valid

Sorry, I have a rather low level in C++.

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2  
If getToto is part of a library that you cannot modify, then the best you can do is to file a bug report with your library vendor. –  Robᵩ Nov 20 '12 at 17:13

3 Answers 3

It depends. Is returning an empty string part of the logic, or is it an exceptional condition.

If it's not supposed to happen, you should throw an error.

If it's okay for the string to be empty, you should just return an empty string:

 return std::string();

The reason it compiles as-is is that false is interpreted as 0, which is NULL, which can be a char*, so a string is attempted to be constructed from it. However, constructing an std::string from a NULL pointer is invalid, that's why you're getting the exception.

Here's how I'd code it:

static std::string getToto(){
   char buffer[1024];
   if ( CTX_Get_Env(buffer, "Toto", 1024) )
      throw InvalidDataInBufferException();
   return buffer;
}

if the string isn't supposed to be empty, or

static std::string getToto(){
   char buffer[1024];
   if ( CTX_Get_Env(buffer, "Toto", 1024) )
      return std::string();
   return buffer;
}

if it's okay for the string to be empty.

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thanks but I am not allowed to modify getToto() method! –  user1839362 Nov 20 '12 at 16:28
    
@user1839362 okay. Did you try setting the Toto environment variable? –  Luchian Grigore Nov 20 '12 at 17:37

The implicit std::string(const char*) constructor is being initialized with false, which is being interpreted as the null pointer. Constructing an std::string from a null pointer is disallowed by the standard. On your platform, this results in an exception being thrown. If you cannot modify the function, you can place the function call inside of a try block, but note that this is by no means guaranteed to work on other platforms.

try {
  std::string returned = Test::getToto().c_str();
  const char* c = returned.c_str();
} catch(...) {
  // handle the error
}

Note 1: Since implementations are not required to raise an exception if an std::string is initialized from a null pointer, calling the getToto() function can result in undefined behaviour. The try-catch blocks only help if your implementation throws an exception, and is therefore not a portable solution. This also means that the library function getToto(), by invoking undefined behaviour, should be avoided.

Note2: The exception was hiding another error, here:

const char* returned = Test::getToto().c_str();

Test::getToto() returns a temporary string, which you do not assign. Your returned pointer is left dangling. In my code example, I assign the return to an std::string, then get the pointer to its internal char data.

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I didn't downvote, but the answer has resulted in a dangling pointer. –  hmjd Nov 20 '12 at 16:26
    
@Mat ah, didn't see that part. –  Luchian Grigore Nov 20 '12 at 16:29
    
The temporary std::string will be destroyed, leaving returned as a dangling pointer. –  hmjd Nov 20 '12 at 16:33
    
@hmjd Yep, saw it and fixed the answer. Thanks. –  juanchopanza Nov 20 '12 at 16:36
1  
I would have expected this to be undefined behaviour. If it is not specified by the standard that an exception be thrown then there is no portable way to fix this given the getToto() function is unmodifiable and forever broken. –  hmjd Nov 20 '12 at 16:49

You should understand that you got an exception BEFORE even getToto() really returns. There is no way to do 'return false' from the function returning string and do not get an exception. It's just a bug. You can override it with try/catch block like this:

const char* returned = NULL;
try{
    returned = Test::getToto().c_str();
}catch(std::exception& e){
    std::cout << "null pointer" << std::endl;
}

but it is still a BAD thing to do.

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