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It is a little tricky to describe my question, but I'll try my best.

First, I am developing a Multi-Document-Interface app using C and WinAPI. My program is able to parse command line arguments to open multiple files. I put this string: "X:\MyAppName.exe" "%1" under the open with command list of the txt files so that now I can right click any .txt files in Windows Explorer and open it with my app. However, when I select multiple files, the explorer runs command "X:\MyAppName.exe" "%1" multiple times so that multiple instances of my app are started.

But wait! That's not the most tricky part. Instead, it is that my app treats opening a single file and opening multiple files at a time as two different things with seperate visual styles. I know the idea of keeping one instance running at a time (though I don't know the C code to implement it). But I don't know how to tell the difference between open several files one by one and opening multiple files at the same time.

I hope I make it clear.

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You have multiple options. Perhaps the prettiest is to say that your app can accept data objects containing multiple objects. –  Raymond Chen Nov 20 '12 at 16:38

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Using the Registry like you currently are, you will not be able to directly differentiate between multiple files from single files. Each requested file will start a new copy of your app, as you have already noticed. If you implement single-instancing (which is not that hard to do), what you could do is detect when the first file is requested and start a short timer, then have each subsequent file reset that timer. When it finally elapses, check how many files you collected and act on them as needed.

A better, and preferred, solution is to instead create an out-of-process COM object in your app that implements the IDropTarget interface. Windows will then be able to funnel file information through a single entry point into your app. Your app will not have to care where the information is coming from. You will be able to support not only multiple files at a time, but even different formats of file information (Windows could pass you just the file names, or it could pass you the actual file data itself).

Windows will construct a single IDataObject object to hold whatever file information is needed, and will then pass it to your IDropTarget object. If your app is already running, COM will be able to access your existing IDropTarget object. If your app is not already running, COM will automatically start your app before then accessing its IDropTarget object. Either way, once it is running, your IDropTarget can look at whatever data is passed to it and decide whether to accept it or reject it.

If you register your COM object's CLSID as a DropTarget for the desired file extensions, users will be able to double-click on such files, or select such files and press Enter, and they will be passed to your IDropTarget object.

If you register an AppPath for your app and then register the CLSID as a DropTarget for it, users will be able to drag files, regardless of extension, onto your app's exe file itself, and they will be passed to your IDropTarget object.

If you use the same COM object with the RegisterDragDrop() function, users will be able to drag files, regardless of extension, onto your app's UI directly, and they will be passed to your IDropTarget object.

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Thank you. This is a really wonderful answer! But one thing I'm confused: you said "users will be able to double-click on such files, or select such files and press Enter", will this override the default open with command in the registry? Or I need to modify the registry too? –  LeOpArD Nov 21 '12 at 15:17
    
It does not replace it, it enhances it. You still have to create a default verb for the file extension in order for a double-click to do something, but you can specify a "DropTarget" for the verb instead of a "command" (the Shell also supports a third option for invoking DDE, but IDropTarget is preferred over that). –  Remy Lebeau Nov 21 '12 at 16:33

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