Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've recently had a problem tracking down a changeset responsible for a specific line in the source file. hg blame was giving me a revision that has never been merged into the branch I was interested in.

I discovered that if there's a similar unrelated change made earlier, Mercurial would still show it as originating revision. Is this a bug or it's supposed to behave like this? If latter, could you explain why.

Here's the minimum example:

hg init test
cd test

# Create a new file that has 3 lines
echo "111\n222\n333" > test.txt
hg commit -Am "Original file"

# Append "444" to the file
echo "444" >> test.txt
hg commit -m "Abandoned change"

# Go back to the first revision and append the same "444" to the file
hg up 0
echo "444" >> test.txt
hg commit -m "Actual change"

Here's what the repo looks like:

$ hg glog
@  changeset:   2:1b16b07e058e
|  tag:         tip
|  parent:      0:e58635de081c
|  user:        Nobody <nobody@nowhere.org>
|  date:        Tue Nov 20 17:17:41 2012 +0100
|  summary:     Actual change
|
| o  changeset:   1:b02ee64b2e2d
|/   user:        Nobody <nobody@nowhere.org>
|    date:        Tue Nov 20 17:17:41 2012 +0100
|    summary:     Abandoned change
|
o  changeset:   0:e58635de081c
   user:        Nobody <nobody@nowhere.org>
   date:        Tue Nov 20 17:17:41 2012 +0100
   summary:     Original file

Now when I run hg blame I expect to see the last line coming from the changeset 2, not changeset 1.

$ hg blame test.txt
0: 111
0: 222
0: 333
1: 444
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is not the intended behavior, you hit Bug 1839.

share|improve this answer
1  
see also explanation here –  Mark Heath Nov 20 '12 at 16:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.