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I have a situration where I have a class

[Table("SomeTable")]
public Class Thing
{
[Key]
public int Id { get; set; }
public string Description { get; set; }
public int ImAForeignKey { get; set; }
public bool HasStuff { get; set; }
}
...
...
public class ugly
{
public Thing Thing { get; set; }
public List<Thing> LotsOfThings { get; set; }
}

Where Thing is some EF class representing a table in a database... I then want to create a collection of ugly:

List<ugly> gruesome;
using (var db = new ThingyDatabase())
{
gruesome = db.Thing
          .Where(r => r.HasStuff && r.ImAForeignKey == passedin.someFKvaluePassedIn )
          .Select(r => new ugly {
                     Thing = passedin,
                     LotsOfThings = ??
           })
    .ToList();
}

...

I unsure about how I populate the ListOfTHings property.... or if I can do it this way... I have an id that I am scouring Thing with and this id (foreign key) can have multiple records witbin Thing but one of the records is going to be the parent record and the rest of them are children. So what I would end up with is a collection of things with their children... hope this helps.

Any thoughts?

share|improve this question
1  
Your question is quite unclear. Elaborate it more –  Kundan Singh Chouhan Nov 20 '12 at 16:43
    
what does LotsOfThings will contain? –  Behnam Esmaili Nov 20 '12 at 16:43
1  
LotsOfThings is a collection of Thing. –  Kix Nov 20 '12 at 16:53
    
well, where do u get LotsOfThings from? does r contain a collection of Things? Do you have to call another method? I guess getting the structure of Thing might help make your question more answerable. –  code4life Nov 20 '12 at 17:38
    
have updated my original questions... hopefully to clarify –  Kix Nov 20 '12 at 18:12

3 Answers 3

Since the only information you gave was the class ugly and the linq statement, I would think this would work:

List<ugly> gruesome;
using (var db = new ThingyDatabase())
{
gruesome = db.Thing
          .Where(r => r.HasStuff )
          .Select(r => new ugly {
                     Thing = r,
                     LotsOfThings = db.Think.Where(rr => rr.ImAForeignKey == r.Id).ToList()
           })
    .ToList();
}

This assumes that there is a property called LotsOfThings in Thing.

If this does not work, please provide the structure of what this is acting on.

share|improve this answer
    
What I am trying to do is to pull back a parent "Thing" and its children (LotsOfThings). –  Kix Nov 20 '12 at 16:55
    
I think the updated code is what you are looking for. –  SBurris Nov 20 '12 at 17:31
    
have update my original question.... –  Kix Nov 20 '12 at 18:12
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I ended up doing the following:

List<ugly> gruesome;
using (var db = new ThingyDatabase())
{
  gruesome = db.Thing
      .Where(r => r.HasStuff && r.ImAForeignKey == passedin.someFKvaluePassedIn )
      .ToList();
}

var ughObj = new Ugly {
    Thing = passedin,
    LotsOfThings = gruesome
}

It gives me what I need the parent(passedin) and the children(gruesome)

thanks all

share|improve this answer
    
How can passedin be a Thing and have a property someFKvaluePassedIn? –  Gert Arnold Nov 20 '12 at 21:12
    
I pass in a parent thing and look for children thing(s)... I should have made it more clear by passedin.ImAForeignKey ... i was in a hurry typing .. :( anyways... I wasnt being very explicit in my example... sorry. –  Kix Nov 20 '12 at 21:17

After reading your question and comments it dawned to me that you only need a navigation property:

public Class Thing
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
    public bool HasStuff { get; set; }

    [ForeignKey("ChildThings")]
    public int ImAForeignKey { get; set; }
    public ICollection<Thing> ChildThings { get; set; }
}

Now you can do:

db.Thing
      .Where(r => r.HasStuff && r.ImAForeignKey == passedin.ImAForeignKey)
      .Select(r => new ugly {
                 Thing = r,
                 LotsOfThings = r.ChildThings
       })

But maybe you don't need the ugly class anymore because the Thing instance contains all you need. Better still: this would be enough:

db.Thing.Include("ChildThings")
      .Where(r => r.HasStuff && r.ImAForeignKey == passedin.ImAForeignKey)
share|improve this answer
    
Certainly has good possibilities... I need to play with this .... –  Kix Nov 21 '12 at 20:54

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