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1

switch($app_id){
    case (
        $app_id == 1 || 
        $app_id == 2
    ):
        //do something
    break;
    case 3:
        //do something else
    break;
}

and

2

switch($app_id){
    case 1:
    case 2: 
        //do something
    break;
    case 3:
        //do something else
    break;
}

apart from etiquette, is there a better reason why you wouldn't do the second or is it entirely up to you?

Reason i ask is because in php.net it says that you should not do the latter regardless of if you want to (snippet from php.net saying you shouldn't do cases without breaks regardless of if you want to stack up the queries or not):

<?php
switch ($i) {
case 0:
    echo "i equals 0";
case 1:
    echo "i equals 1";
case 2:
    echo "i equals 2";
}
?>

Here, if $i is equal to 0, PHP would execute all of the echo statements! If $i is equal to 1, PHP would execute the last two echo statements. You would get the expected behavior ('i equals 2' would be displayed) only if $i is equal to 2. Thus, it is important not to forget break statements (even though you may want to avoid supplying them on purpose under certain circumstances).

Reasons so far:

  1. ANSWER: if I omit a break to allow for a fall-through, I put in a comment to say that there's a fall-through occuring, just so the next person coming along doesn't go "aha! missing break! BOOM" – Marc B

    MY COMMENT: Excellent reason Marc! that is the bum of etiquette.. if you break it, people aren't ready to be pood on by their captain correctness.

  2. ANSWER: @JamesT: What you've read only warns you about forgetting it by mistake, because it's a very common programming error. You can do it if it's intended. – Madara Uchiha

    MY COMMENT: I think then that etiquette wins this question. Do put breaks in because it may be confusing to the next person editing your code; alas do it if you are sensible enough to put in a comment to explain you meant to miss it out

  3. ANSWER: You're miss understanding their sentiment. They're talking about omitting breaks when there are individual actions for each case, such as my first example. Grouping cases, such as my 4 and 5 from example one is perfectly fine and encouraged if actions are entirely shared across cases. – Rawkode

    MY COMMENT: I agree that this sentence can be misread. I see no reason apart from confusing future developers into questioning whether you did or did not mean to leave a break out.

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2  
I don't think you're placing your break statement(s) correctly. –  Blazemonger Nov 20 '12 at 16:42
    
Actually, you shouldn't be using switch at all. –  moonwave99 Nov 20 '12 at 16:43
    
Sorry please reread question, i sodded my question up. sorry. ive corrected it. –  Jimmyt1988 Nov 20 '12 at 16:44
2  
if I omit a break to allow for a fall-through, I put in a comment to say that there's a fall-through occuring, just so the next person coming along doesn't go "aha! missing break! BOOM" –  Marc B Nov 20 '12 at 16:46
    
That's a very interesting reason! THANKS! keep em coming! –  Jimmyt1988 Nov 20 '12 at 16:50
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3 Answers

Well, your first example is likely not to behave the way you expect it.

switch($app_id){
    case (
        $app_id == 1 || 
        $app_id == 3
    ):
        //do something
    case 3:
        //do something else
    break;
}

This would evaluate the condition and resolve to a TRUE or FALSE value, which would then be compare to $app_id. In this (very specific) case, you'll get the expected result, but this isn't the correct way of doing it!.

When using a switch case, the second approach you've displayed is better.


The break statement is used to exit from a case once it is satisfied. You can leave it out, and execute all subsequent cases. It's perfectly fine implement it that way if that's the expected behavior. Don't forget to add comments to clarify it. Be kind to future you!

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Please check the question again, I mistyped it and have corrected it. I know how statements work, I am wondering why php.net doesn't want you to leave out breaks regardless of if itll work or not. –  Jimmyt1988 Nov 20 '12 at 16:48
    
@JamesT: I have edited. –  Second Rikudo Nov 20 '12 at 16:51
    
I wonder why php.net states you shouldn't do it then? Odd for them to put it then and then follow with demonstrations of its use. Maybe im misreading the statement –  Jimmyt1988 Nov 20 '12 at 16:54
1  
@JamesT: What you've read only warns you about forgetting it by mistake, because it's a very common programming error. You can do it if it's intended. –  Second Rikudo Nov 20 '12 at 16:55
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The first construct must be written like this in order to work:

switch(true) {
    case $app_id == 1 || $app_id == 3:
        //do something
        break;
    case 3:
        //do something else
        break;
}

Which kind of works but against the etiquettes.

The note your mentioned about not forgetting breaks is a warning about a common programming mistake. In no way it discourages you from using the switch statement.

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add comment

The switch below is the same as if($i == 1 || $i == 2 || $i == 3)

switch($i) {
  case 1:
    echo "1";
  case 2:
    echo "2";
  case 3:
    echo "3";
    break;
}

Assuming $i == 1, the above code would actually output "123" - which is typically incorrect.

Correct example:

if ($i == 1) // Do something
else if ($i == 2) // Do something else, etc

is the same as

switch(i) {
  case 1:
    echo "1";
    break;
  case 2:
    echo "1";
    break;

  case 4:
  case 5:
    echo "This is 4 and 5";
    break;
}

The above code is only going to output "1" for $i == 1

Some people do contain their cases within {}'s, but this is purely for readability and will not force a break.

In regard to your example of case (4 || 5) - This will cause a syntax error.

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The question is.. why do you do one over the other. regardless of the exact same outcome. Is it just etiquette to do conditions like statement 1 –  Jimmyt1988 Nov 20 '12 at 16:46
    
Updated answer with a couple more points. Example two, I would say, it the preferred example. It's clean and easy to ready/follow. –  Rawkode Nov 20 '12 at 16:50
    
but php.net states that you should not miss out breaks.. so the question is why. from your statement, if i == 3, then itll output "1 This is 4 and 5".. if you want that to happen, why shouldnt you do it like that... I think the answer is.. etiquette. –  Jimmyt1988 Nov 20 '12 at 16:53
    
Where does it say that on the PHP docs? Link please. –  Rawkode Nov 20 '12 at 16:55
2  
You're miss understanding their sentiment. They're talking about omitting breaks when there are individual actions for each case, such as my first example. Grouping cases, such as my 4 and 5 from example two is perfectly fine and encouraged if actions are entirely shared across cases. –  Rawkode Nov 20 '12 at 16:58
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