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I am using python 3.1, on a windows 7 machines. Russian is the default system language, and utf-8 is the default encoding.

Looking at the answer to a previous question, I have attempting using the "codecs" module to give me a little luck. Here's a few examples:

>>> g = codecs.open("C:\Users\Eric\Desktop\beeline.txt", "r", encoding="utf-8")
SyntaxError: (unicode error) 'unicodeescape' codec can't decode bytes in position 2-4: truncated \UXXXXXXXX escape (<pyshell#39>, line 1)
>>> g = codecs.open("C:\Users\Eric\Desktop\Site.txt", "r", encoding="utf-8")
SyntaxError: (unicode error) 'unicodeescape' codec can't decode bytes in position 2-4: truncated \UXXXXXXXX escape (<pyshell#40>, line 1)
>>> g = codecs.open("C:\Python31\Notes.txt", "r", encoding="utf-8")
SyntaxError: (unicode error) 'unicodeescape' codec can't decode bytes in position 11-12: malformed \N character escape (<pyshell#41>, line 1)
>>> g = codecs.open("C:\Users\Eric\Desktop\Site.txt", "r", encoding="utf-8")
SyntaxError: (unicode error) 'unicodeescape' codec can't decode bytes in position 2-4: truncated \UXXXXXXXX escape (<pyshell#44>, line 1)

My last idea was, I thought it might have been the fact that windows "translates" a few folders, such as the "users" folder, into Russian (though typing "users" is still the correct path), so I tried it in the Python31 folder. Still, no luck. Any ideas?

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Unrelated to your question, but it's highly advised you not use Python 3.x yet, unless you have a particularly good reason to, like porting a library over to it. – aehlke Aug 28 '09 at 15:39
1  
Wahnfrieden - why? Not as much library support, sure, but other than that? – orip Aug 28 '09 at 15:48
2  
@Wahnfrieden What? Python 2 is to be phased out in the future, so it makes sense to use Python 3, despite its "lack" of "maturity". – Humphrey Bogart Feb 24 '10 at 0:11
    
@Beau Martinez @orip (significant) lack of library support is a good enough reason for most cases. With the Py3k features back-ported to Python 2.6 and 2.7, porting to 3.x later on will be easy anyway, and you don't sacrifice huge amounts of library support (which is especially hazardous if you're a new user and can't properly anticipate which libraries you'd want). – aehlke Feb 25 '10 at 3:10
up vote 132 down vote accepted

The problem is with the string

"C:\Users\Eric\Desktop\beeline.txt"

Here, \U starts an eight-character Unicode escape, such as '\U00014321`. In your code, the escape is followed by the character 's', which is invalid.

You either need to duplicate all backslashes, or prefix the string with r (to produce a raw string).

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12  
Hahaha... What an easy trap to fall into, like I just have. Awesome answer. – Humphrey Bogart Feb 24 '10 at 0:04
    
I found this error in a function docstring while porting a 2.x code to python3. – Sridhar Ratnakumar Apr 28 '10 at 20:16
    
I ran into this error when I used triple quote ''' comments around a section of code that contained a raw string with a \U in it. I.E. the string didn't give me an error until I tried to comment it out. For this reason the double backslash method might be preferred. – Chris Mueller May 22 '15 at 15:46

Typical error on Windows because the default user directory is C:\user\<your_user>, so when you want to use this path as an string parameter into a Python function, you get a Unicode error, just because the \u is a Unicode escape. Any character not numeric after this produces an error.

To solve it, just double the backslashes: C:\\\user\\\<\your_user>...

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Good one, thanks :) – jlengrand yesterday

I had this same error in python 3.2.

I have script for email sending and:

csv.reader(open('work_dir\uslugi1.csv', newline='', encoding='utf-8'))

when I remove first char in file uslugi1.csv works fine.

share|improve this answer

You may use

fileName=r"C:\Users\XYZ\ABC\def.txt"
open(fileName, encoding="utf8")
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2  
Please consider editing your post to add more explanation about what your code does and why it will solve the problem. An answer that mostly just contains code (even if it's working) usually wont help the OP to understand their problem. – SuperBiasedMan Nov 3 '15 at 9:35
    
Thanks @Deepika Anand, its works, could please explain how? thx – Java.beginner Nov 26 '15 at 11:47
    
Refer the official documentation on page :docs.python.org/2/howto/unicode.html . specially the line "In Python source code, Unicode literals are written as strings prefixed with the ‘u’ or ‘U’ character: u'abcdefghijk'. Specific code points can be written using the \u escape sequence, which is followed by four hex digits giving the code point. The \U escape sequence is similar, but expects 8 hex digits, not 4." – Deepika Anand Nov 28 '15 at 5:26

Or you could replace '\' with '/' in the path.

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1  
I advice you to take the tour and visit the help center. Your answer doesn't seem to meet our quality standards. You need to elaborate a bit why this would work, maybe create the complete code example. – rene Nov 3 '15 at 8:46
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! Please consider editing your post to add more explanation about what your code does and why it will solve the problem. An answer that mostly just contains code (even if it's working) usually wont help the OP to understand their problem. – SuperBiasedMan Nov 3 '15 at 9:38

protected by Mogsdad Nov 3 '15 at 14:42

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