Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am given a string, i.e. "CPHBDZ". By inserting (in this order) letters to a BST I will have:

  C
 / \
B   P
   / \
  H   Z
 /
D

If we change order of the string to "CBPHDZ" we will get identical tree. And I have to find and list all permutations of the input string that provide the same BST. I came up with how to calculate a number of those permutations but I can't figure out any algorithm which actually finds them.

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by Ben, C-Pound Guru, Yuck, Linger, Ram kiran Nov 23 '12 at 3:42

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
That's nice. Did you have a question, or are you just showing off some stuff? – Marc B Nov 20 '12 at 16:54
1  
+1 . I clearly see a question here. And a rather good one. – axiom Nov 20 '12 at 17:05

Assuming you're not doing any rotations (etc.) to balance the tree, you can derive an answer from the structure of the tree: new nodes are always added as descendants of existing nodes, so any node higher in the tree must precede of its own descendants, but can be rearranged at will with its "peers" (anything that's neither its parent nor descendant).

For example, since you have C as the root of the tree, C must have been the first item that was read from the stream. Since its descendants are B and P, the next item in the input had to be one of those two. B doesn't have any descendants, but P has two: H and Z, so they had to be read after P, but can be in any order with respect to B. Likewise, Z can be in any order with respect to H and D, but H must precede D.

Edit: As to generating all those permutations, one simple (cheating) way would be to use Prolog. Basically, you encode that dependencies as "facts", and it'll generate all the permutations that fit those facts. In fact (no pun intended), this is pretty much a description of what Prolog is/does.

Doing it on your own, you'd probably want to do most of the job recursively. A valid ordering is a root followed by any interleaving of the valid orders of its descendants.

As far as how to do the interleaving, you would (for example) generate one valid order of the left sub-tree and one valid order of the right subtree. Put them together into an array with all the items from the left sub-tree at the beginning, and all those from the right sub-tree at the end. For demonstration, let's assume the tree also contained an A (as a descendant of the B you show). In an array, our data from our sub-trees would look like:

B A P H Z D

Then we start from the last item from the left sub-tree, and "walk" each across the array to the right, generating a new permutation each time:

B P A H Z D
P B A H Z D
B P H A Z D
P B H A Z D
P H B A Z D
[ ... ]    

For each valid order of the left sub-tree, you need to do all these interleavings with each valid order of the right sub-tree (and return it to the parent, which will do the same).

share|improve this answer
    
i think this is a reasoning that can be used to count the permutations. Any more cleaner way to actually generate all of them? – axiom Nov 20 '12 at 17:05
    
"A valid ordering is a root followed by any interleaving of the valid orders of its descendants." thit solves the problem, IMO. – chill Nov 20 '12 at 17:34
    
@chill: Yes, I at least tried to follow pretty much the classic recursive/inductive formulation. – Jerry Coffin Nov 20 '12 at 17:44

In Python,

tree = {
    'C' : ['B', 'P'],
    'P' : ['H','Z'],
    'H' : ['D']}

def f(tree,  ready):
    if not ready:
        return [[]]
    else:
        rv = []
        for r in ready:
            for rest in f(tree,
                          [n for n in ready if r != n] + tree.get(r, [])):
               rv.append([r] + rest)
        return rv

for o in f(tree, 'C'):
    print ''.join(o)
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.