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Okay, so as far as I know, I understand these things about a final variable.

  1. It should be assigned only once
  2. All the final variables should be initialized before the constructor completes

Now using the above, I do not understand how the below doesn't work:

public class FinalTest implements AnotherClass {

    private final Something something;
    private final otherthing;

    @Override
    public void setStuff(Something something) {
        this.something = something;
        this.otherthing = new SomeClass(something);
    }

    public FinalTest(Something something) {
        setStuff(something);
    }
}

Here, before the constructor completes the final variables are being set. So why does the compiler complain against it?

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3  
What is the type of otherthing? –  maerics Nov 20 '12 at 17:04
2  
Here's the JLS chapter on definite assignment for you. docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-16.html Enjoy. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Nov 20 '12 at 17:05
1  
Final variables are nice but there are a lot of times they just don't make sense. If you don't have any way to set it from within your class it is still "Logically" final, so don't get too hung up on forcing it. Also consider the validity of calling a method (which assumes your class is in a finished state) from a constructor (responsible for finishing the classes state). This needs to be done with care. –  Bill K Nov 20 '12 at 17:06
    
@BillK: Thanks, that actually made sense. Will keep that in mind. –  noMAD Nov 20 '12 at 19:40
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5 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

It's not necessary that your method gets called only from constructor, it can be called from outside your constructor also. And even a second call might be added to the same constructor in future also.

Even though you might not have used it now, but Compiler cannot be sure about it, so it does not allow it. In technical term, there is no definite assignment.

For e.g: - suppose you instantiate your class from main: -

public static void main(String[] args) {
    FinalTest obj = new FinalTest(something);

    obj.setStuff(something); // There you go. This cannot be prevented. 
}

See JLS - Definite Assignments for detailed explanation on this.

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+1 good explanation:) –  PermGenError Nov 20 '12 at 17:07
    
@GanGnaMStYleOverFlowErroR.. Thanks :) –  Rohit Jain Nov 20 '12 at 17:08
4  
This explanation does not makes sense since if I make it private then it should allow me to do it by this explanation. The real reason is there is no definite assignment. –  AmitD Nov 20 '12 at 17:18
    
@AmitD.. Yeah you are quite right. Should have added that term. –  Rohit Jain Nov 20 '12 at 17:31
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Because nobody is stopping you from calling setStuff() a second time later on in the life of the object, which would be illegal.

final fields can only be assigned in code blocks that are guaranteed to run only once, that is constructors and instance initialisers. (Or a static initialiser in case of a static final field.)

More on this can be found in the JLS.

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2  
also worth mentioning that it is possible to observe a final variable in two different states (null and assigned value) if the final is accessed by an overridable method in the constructor (which is why constructors should never invoke overridable methods) –  cfeduke Nov 20 '12 at 17:13
    
@cfeduke One of the many reasons, yes. –  biziclop Nov 20 '12 at 17:14
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because the compiler doesn't know that the only call to

public void setStuff(Something something) {
    this.something = something;
    this.otherthing = new SomeClass(something);
}

is from the constructor

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Should the following line be

private final otherthing;

something like

private final Something otherthing;

you are missing the class.

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does not address the question –  Sam I am Nov 20 '12 at 17:06
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Just a side note:

@Override
public void setStuff(Something something) {
    this.something = something;
    this.otherthing = new SomeClass(something);
}

public FinalTest(Something something) {
    setStuff(something);
}

That's really a bad design. You should not invoke an overridable method from the constructor.

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I know it's not realted to the concrete problem. But I think it's a good advice. Why downvote? –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 20 '12 at 17:13
    
because it's not related to the concrete problem –  Sam I am Nov 20 '12 at 17:14
    
I think it was downvoted because it's not really an answer, should be a a comment instead. It is a very useful thing to know though and can't be repeated enough times. –  biziclop Nov 20 '12 at 17:15
    
Thank you!!!!!!! –  noMAD Nov 20 '12 at 17:37
    
setStuff is not just overridable, it's overridden. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Nov 20 '12 at 18:05
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