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class Overload{

  public static void main(String args[]) {
    int[]  number={1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10};   
    int [] num={1,2,3,4,5};
    int i;
    int sum=0;
    sum = f(number);   
    int sum1= f(num);
    System.out.println("The sum is" +sum + ".");
    System.out.println("The sum is" +sum1 + ".");
  }

  public static int f(int[] value) {
    int i, total = 0;
    for(i=0; i<10; i++) {
      total = total + value[ i ];
    }
    return (total);
  }

  public static int f(int... x) {
    int i, total = 0;
    for(i=0; i<10; i++) {
      total = total + x[ i ];
    }
    return (total);
  }

}

While compiling the above program I'm getting the error as

C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.7.0_09\bin>javac Overload.java
Overload.java:30: error: cannot declare both f(int...) and f(int[]) in Overload
public static int f(int... x)
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1  
See stackoverflow.com/editing-help for how markdown works on SO –  jschoen Nov 20 '12 at 17:16

3 Answers 3

public static int f(int... x)

is nothing but: -

public static int f(int[] x)

with only difference that it does not necessarily needs an argument to be passed. And when you pass individual elements, they are converted to an array internally. So, you are actually passing an array only.

Whereas the later one needs an argument. An empty array at the least.

And both the methods are eligible to be invoked, if you are passing an array as argument.

So the call:

f(new int[] {1, 2});

can be made to both the methods. So, an ambiguity is there.


However, f(5) call can only be made for the first method. Since, 5 cannot be assigned to an array type. So, the ambiguity only occurs when you are passing an array.

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4  
That's not really a good description of varargs. It's not like an optional parameter - it's an array parameter where the values can be specified individually. –  Jon Skeet Nov 20 '12 at 17:15
1  
to elaborate, Java converts varargs to an array underneath the covers, and you cannot have two methods with the same name and signature. –  smcg Nov 20 '12 at 17:15
    
@JonSkeet.. Yeah that's correct. I've edited my post quoting that part. –  Rohit Jain Nov 20 '12 at 17:27
    
@rohit thank u bro –  Praveen Nov 20 '12 at 17:30
    
@Praveen.. You're welcome :) –  Rohit Jain Nov 20 '12 at 17:34

your compiler thinks that the method which takes variable arguments as an argument might be the same as an method which takes an array as an argument. i.e., it thinks there are duplicate methods with the same number of arguments, which contrays overloading rules.

public void m1(int[] arr){

}

public void m1(int...i){

}

are basically same.the only difference is var-args can accept any number of int variables

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1  
That's because underneath it all, there are duplicate methods. The ... is just syntactic sugar; Java turns it into an array when compiling. –  cHao Nov 20 '12 at 17:17
    
@cHao that is what my intention was. :) i am just lacking terminology i guess :P –  PermGenError Nov 20 '12 at 17:18
    
And var-args must be the last parameter in a method, that would make a big difference. –  Luiggi Mendoza Nov 20 '12 at 17:18
    
@LuiggiMendoza yepp, thats an useful tip :) –  PermGenError Nov 20 '12 at 17:19
    
It's not a tip, it's how Java language was designed. –  Luiggi Mendoza Nov 20 '12 at 17:19

The method signature is the same. Thus overload is impossible. Change the method signature.

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