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Plot logarithmic axes with matplotlib in python

I have a 50*1050 matrix in which the dimension 50 represents the frequency and 1050 the time. I tried to plot it using imshow and I get this image:

http://ge.tt/26MVT0S/v/0?c

But i want to highlight the lower frequencies, which means I need to use the logarithmic scale for the y scale. I searched a lot but I didn't find any effective solution yet.

What I need exactly is that the first row of the matrix should occupy the biggest percentage of the image and as the rows increase, the width if the row they occupy in the image should decrease. Any suggestion?

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marked as duplicate by joaquin, AAA, Jim Garrison, Bobrovsky, Toon Krijthe Nov 21 '12 at 7:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
ax.set_yscale('log') –  joaquin Nov 20 '12 at 17:18
    
@joaquin - post as answer –  AAA Nov 20 '12 at 17:20
    
@djechlin there are already answers to this question in SO. You only need to google matplotlib + log + scale –  joaquin Nov 20 '12 at 17:22
    
ax.set_yscale('log') doesn't help me. it just make the y scale logarithmic. Look at this, when i use you command : ge.tt/5cAJX0S/v/0?c –  Mojtaba Nov 20 '12 at 17:23
    
The links you are reffering me two, doesn't answer my question. the nearest question is this stackoverflow.com/questions/1679126/… –  Mojtaba Nov 20 '12 at 17:26

1 Answer 1

Update the axis:

a = list(axis())
a[3] = 10
axis(a)
yscale('log')
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I don't know why thet closed this topics. Thank you for the response, but this is not my answer. It doesn't help me, it just change the numbers on the axis, doesn't make any different finally in how the image look like. –  Mojtaba Nov 23 '12 at 8:16

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