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I have a text file that has several hundred configuration values. The general format of the configuration data is "Label:Value". Using C# .net, I would like to read these configurations, and use the Values in other portions of the code. My first thought is that I would use a string search to look for the Labels then parse out the values following the labels and add them to a dictionary, but this seems rather tedious considering the number of labels/values that I would have to search for. I am interested to hear some thoughts on a possible architecture to perform this task. I have included a small section of a sample text file that contains some of the labels and values (below). A couple of notes: The Values are not always numeric (as seen in the AUX Serial Number); For whatever reason, the text files were formatted using spaces (\s) rather than tabs (\t). Thanks in advance for any time you spend thinking about this.

Sample Text:

 AUX Serial Number:  445P000023       AUX Hardware Rev:           1

 Barometric Pressure Slope:     -1.452153E-02
 Barometric Pressure Intercept: 9.524336E+02
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What have you tried? –  Oded Nov 20 '12 at 17:26
    
I have not tried anything yet. I want to think about the architecture before I start coding... Maybe the wrong approach, but seems to work for me. –  ZaffaZ Nov 20 '12 at 17:29
    
that looks like a pretty horrible file, what with the multiple entries per line, empty lines, etc. Any shot of getting it formatted less terribly? If not odds are some odd values will seem like delimiters when they're not. –  Servy Nov 20 '12 at 17:29
    
@Servy I agree with you. Unfortunately I can't format it. The file is dumped from the EEPROM of an instrument over RS232, and the formatting is part of the stream. –  ZaffaZ Nov 20 '12 at 17:36
    
And the whitespace isn't even tabs, it's just some unknown number of spaces, making those spaces indistinguishable from the spaces in the label names or values (if the values can have spaces). –  Servy Nov 20 '12 at 17:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a nice little brain tickler. I think this code might be able to point you in the right direction. Keep in mind, this fills a Dictionary<string, string>, so there are no conversions of values into ints or the like. Also, please excuse the mess (and the poor naming conventions). It was a quick write-up based on my train of thought.

Dictionary<string, string> allTheThings = new Dictionary<string, string>();

public void ReadIt()
{
    // Open the file into a streamreader
    using (System.IO.StreamReader sr = new System.IO.StreamReader("text_path_here.txt"))
    {
        while (!sr.EndOfStream) // Keep reading until we get to the end
        {
            string splitMe = sr.ReadLine();
            string[] bananaSplits = splitMe.Split(new char[] { ':' }); //Split at the colons

            if (bananaSplits.Length < 2) // If we get less than 2 results, discard them
                continue; 
            else if (bananaSplits.Length == 2) // Easy part. If there are 2 results, add them to the dictionary
                allTheThings.Add(bananaSplits[0].Trim(), bananaSplits[1].Trim());
            else if (bananaSplits.Length > 2)
                SplitItGood(splitMe, allTheThings); // Hard part. If there are more than 2 results, use the method below.
        }
    }
}

public void SplitItGood(string stringInput, Dictionary<string, string> dictInput)
{
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    List<string> fish = new List<string>(); // This list will hold the keys and values as we find them
    bool hasFirstValue = false;

    foreach (char c in stringInput) // Iterate through each character in the input
    {
        if (c != ':') // Keep building the string until we reach a colon
            sb.Append(c);
        else if (c == ':' && !hasFirstValue)
        {
            fish.Add(sb.ToString().Trim());
            sb.Clear();
            hasFirstValue = true;
        }
        else if (c == ':' && hasFirstValue)
        {

            // Below, the StringBuilder currently has something like this:
            // "    235235         Some Text Here"
            // We trim the leading whitespace, then split at the first sign of a double space
            string[] bananaSplit = sb.ToString()
                                     .Trim()
                                     .Split(new string[] { "  " },
                                            StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

            // Add both results to the list
            fish.Add(bananaSplit[0].Trim());
            fish.Add(bananaSplit[1].Trim());
            sb.Clear();
        }                    
    }

    fish.Add(sb.ToString().Trim()); // Add the last result to the list

    for (int i = 0; i < fish.Count; i += 2)
    {
        // This for loop assumes that the amount of keys and values added together
        // is an even number. If it comes out odd, then one of the lines on the input
        // text file wasn't parsed correctly or wasn't generated correctly.
        dictInput.Add(fish[i], fish[i + 1]); 
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! I like the theory behind this, as it will accomodate multiple colons on the same line (which the file does have). I prototyped this in LabView and it worked like a charm. I am going to go ahead and build this out into C#. Thanks again! –  ZaffaZ Nov 20 '12 at 23:34
    
@ZaffaZ Hey, not a problem at all. Sorry again about the weird object names. Make sure you change them to so that you understand them better :p –  Ichabod Clay Nov 21 '12 at 6:50
    
+1 Very useful piece of code –  geogeek Dec 4 '13 at 16:31

So the only general approach that I can think of, given the format that you're limited to, is to first find the first colon on the line and take everything before it as the label. Skip all whilespace characters until you get to the first non-whitespace character. Take all non-whitespace characters as the value of the label. If there is a colon after the end of that value take everything after the end of the previous value to the colon as the next value and repeat. You'll also probably need to trim whitespace around the labels.

You might be able to capture that meaning with a regex, but it wouldn't likely be a pretty one if you could; I'd avoid it for something this complex unless you're entire development team is very proficient with them.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a good thought. Looking at the labels, all words in the labels are separated by only on space, whereas the values may be separated from the ":" by any number of white spaces. Also, there is no whitespace in the values. If I use the ":" as the anchor point, and collapse the whitespace on the left (as long as there is only one space) and collapse the consecutive whitespace on the right (until I hit a non-whitespace value), I could have a condensed Label:Value... right? –  ZaffaZ Nov 20 '12 at 17:54
    
@ZaffaZ I wouldn't worry about collapsing whitespace at all. Just deal with substrings of indexes. int colon = line.indexof(':'); string firstLabel = line.substring(0, colon); for(int i = colon; i < line.Length; i++){if( line[i].IsNotWhitespace()){for(int j = i; j < line.Length; j++){if(line[j].IsWhiteSpace){string value = line.substring(i, j - i);}}. Now, obviously, that won't come close to compiling, or even working, it's just the general idea of how I'd approach the problem. –  Servy Nov 20 '12 at 18:00
    
I like it! I will try to put together a prototype, and let you know how it goes. –  ZaffaZ Nov 20 '12 at 18:05

I would try something like this:

  1. While string contains triple space, replace it with double space.
  2. Replace all ": " and ": " (: with double space) with ":".
  3. Replace all " " (double space) with '\n' (new line).
  4. If line don't contain ':' than skip the line. Else, use string.Split(':'). This way you receive arrays of 2 strings (key and value). Some of them may contain empty characters at the beginning or at the end.
  5. Use string.Trim() to get rid of those empty characters.
  6. Add received key and value to Dictionary.

I am not sure if it solves all your cases but it's a general clue how I would try to do it. If it works you could think about performance (use StringBuilder instead of string wherever it is possible etc.).

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting thought... I did not consider replacements... Thanks for your ideas! –  ZaffaZ Nov 20 '12 at 18:08

This is probably the dirtiest function I´ve ever written, but it works.

            StreamReader reader = new StreamReader("c:/yourFile.txt");

            Dictionary<string, string> yourDic = new Dictionary<string, string>();            

            StreamReader reader = new StreamReader("c:/yourFile.txt");

            Dictionary<string, string> yourDic = new Dictionary<string, string>();

            while (reader.Peek() >= 0)
            {
                string line = reader.ReadLine();
                string[] data = line.Split(':');

                if (line != String.Empty)
                {
                    for (int i = 0; i < data.Length - 1; i++)
                    {
                        if (i != 0)
                        {
                            bool isPair;
                            if (i % 2 == 0)
                            {
                                isPair = true;
                            }
                            else
                            {
                                isPair = false;
                            }

                            if (isPair)
                            {
                                string keyOdd = data[i].Trim();
                                try { keyOdd = keyOdd.Substring(keyOdd.IndexOf(' ')).TrimStart(); }
                                catch { }
                                string valueOdd = data[i + 1].TrimStart();
                                try { valueOdd = valueOdd.Remove(valueOdd.IndexOf(' ')); } catch{}
                                yourDic.Add(keyOdd, valueOdd);
                            }
                            else
                            {
                                string keyPair = data[i].TrimStart();
                                keyPair = keyPair.Substring(keyPair.IndexOf(' ')).Trim();
                                string valuePair = data[i + 1].TrimStart();
                                try { valuePair = valuePair.Remove(valuePair.IndexOf(' ')); } catch { }
                                yourDic.Add(keyPair, valuePair);
                            }

                        }
                        else
                        {
                            string key = data[i].Trim();
                            string value = data[i + 1].TrimStart();
                            try { value = value.Remove(value.IndexOf(' ')); } catch{}
                            yourDic.Add(key, value);
                        }
                    }
                }
            }

How does it works?, well splitting the line you can know what you can get in every position of the array, so I just play with the even and odd values. You will understand me when you debug this function :D. It fills the Dictionary that you need.

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I have another idea. Does values contain spaces? If not you could do like this:

  1. Ignore white spaces until you read some other char (first char of key).
  2. Read string until ':' occures.
  3. Trim key that you get.
  4. Ignore white spaces until you read some other char (first char of value).
  5. Read until you get empty char.
  6. Trim value that you get.
  7. If it is the end than stop. Else, go back to step 1.

Good luck.

share|improve this answer

Maybe something like this would work, be careful with the ':' character

            StreamReader reader = new StreamReader("c:/yourFile.txt");

            Dictionary<string, string> yourDic = new Dictionary<string, string>();

            while (reader.Peek() >= 0)
            {
                 string line = reader.ReadLine();
                 yourDic.Add(line.Split(':')[0], line.Split(':')[1]);
            }

Anyway, I recommend to organize that file in some way that you´ll always know in what format it comes.

share|improve this answer
    
This won't work as there are 0..N entries per line, rather than exactly 1. –  Servy Nov 20 '12 at 17:49

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