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Attached is a fiddle that lays out my schema with a comment along side each table to indicate the number of rows in each of the aforementioned tables. The query looks like so, in case the fiddle is blocked:

select distinct cat_name,cat_age, co_cat_owners_id,cat_weight,cs_is_alive,os_is_current, cos_is_current,
      sum(cat_age) over(partition by co_cat_owners_id) running_total
from
   (
         select co.cat_owners_id co_cat_owners_id,
               co.cat_id co_cat_id,
               co.owner_id co_owner_id,
               co.vet_id co_vet_id, 
               cos.is_current cos_is_current,
               os.is_current os_is_current,
               cs.is_alive cs_is_alive,
               cat.name cat_name,
               cat.age cat_age,
               cat.weight cat_weight
         from cat_owners co,
              cat_owner_statuses cos,
              cat_statuses cs,
              cats cat,
              owners o,
              owner_statuses os
         where o.owner_id = co.owner_id
         and cat.cat_id = co.cat_id
         and cos.last_visit >= sysdate - 4/24
    )
where cs_is_alive = '1' 
and (cos_is_current = '1' OR os_is_current='1')
group by cat_name,cat_age,cat_weight,cs_is_alive,os_is_current,co_cat_owners_id,cos_is_current;

In my development environment the explain plan lays out very closely to what is inside the fiddle, in terms of steps, however I do have several steps where Memory size is 15E (exabytes) with a row count of 4000P (petabytes). My question is where along the lines of index creation/bad SQL did I manage to generate a 15 exabyte solution to a problem that should be solvable in far less space and time. I have noticed that tweaking some of the composite index creation steps yields slightly different results, but I am still blocked by an Exabyte space requirement.

NOTE

In case someone in the future doesn't read all of the comments, running the following function in conjunction with correct joins helped:

analyze table table_name_here compute statistics;
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your query has 6 tables in the FROM clause but you have only specified two join conditions. OWNERS has 10 million rows, CAT_OWNERS has 120 million rows so I'm guessing that the join produces 120 million rows. Then you join to CATS which has 1 million rows so I'm assuming at this point that you've got 120 million rows. From there, however, you have no more join conditions. So your 120 million row interim result gets cartesian joined with the 500 million row CAT_OWNER_STATUSES table which produces 120 million * 500 million rows which is 60 quadrillion rows. Cartesian join that to the 10 million row CAT_STATUSES table and you end up with 60 quadrillion * 10 million rows and now we're up to 6 * 10^23 rows. And then you Cartesian join that again to OWNER_STATUSES which has 90 million rows which gives you 5.4 * 10^31 rows. If you want a reasonable number of results, you are going to need to specify additional join conditions to avoid the Cartesian products.

It is, unfortunately, a bit hard to follow the data model in your fiddle because there appear to be a number of potentially contradictory ways to join your tables together. CAT_VETS maps cats to vets but so does CAT_OWNERS, for example. Without data and expected results, that makes it very tough to guess at how the tables should be joined. My guess is that you want something like this modified fiddle

select distinct cat_name,cat_age, co_cat_owners_id,cat_weight,cs_is_alive,os_is_current, cos_is_current,
      sum(cat_age) over(partition by co_cat_owners_id) running_total
from
   (
         select co.cat_owners_id co_cat_owners_id,
               co.cat_id co_cat_id,
               co.owner_id co_owner_id,
               co.vet_id co_vet_id, 
               cos.is_current cos_is_current,
               os.is_current os_is_current,
               cs.is_alive cs_is_alive,
               cat.name cat_name,
               cat.age cat_age,
               cat.weight cat_weight
         from cat_owners co,
              cat_owner_statuses cos,
              cat_statuses cs,
              cats cat,
              owners o,
              owner_statuses os,
              cat_vets cv,
              owner_vets ov
         where o.owner_id = co.owner_id
         and cat.cat_id = co.cat_id
         and cos.cat_owners_id = co.cat_owners_id
         and cs.cat_vets_id = cv.cat_vets_id
         and os.owner_vets_id = ov.owner_vets_id
         and ov.owner_id = o.owner_id
         and co.vet_id = ov.vet_id
         and co.vet_id = cv.vet_id
         and cos.last_visit >= sysdate - 4/24
    )
where cs_is_alive = '1' 
and (cos_is_current = '1' OR os_is_current='1')
group by cat_name,cat_age,cat_weight,cs_is_alive,os_is_current,co_cat_owners_id,cos_is_current;
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Sure, the plan looks less horrifying I will say that much. It would seem I have to eat the full table scan every time, which I am guessing in this case is more efficient than partitioning off 15 exabytes of temp space. –  Woot4Moo Nov 20 '12 at 18:39
    
@Woot4Moo - What table is being full scanned? The query plan on the fiddle isn't doing any table scans. Of course, a full table scan on some table might well be more efficient in the actual system... –  Justin Cave Nov 20 '12 at 18:54
    
oops I misread Index Full Scan as table scanning. –  Woot4Moo Nov 20 '12 at 18:59
    
This in conjunction with computing statistics brought my database back to normal –  Woot4Moo Nov 21 '12 at 13:42
    
As a side question, would bitmap indices be of value here? Specifically on columns that are booleans (Varchar2(1))? –  Woot4Moo Nov 21 '12 at 13:44

As you don't use the join syntax you missed to join any rows of the cat_statuses, cat_owner_statuses and owner_statuses with any of the remaining tables. This will cause a cross join between each of these tables and the joined table. How many rows do the two 'statuses' tables contain?

Consider joining each table instead of listing them with a comma and then filter out using the where. I am not sure how SQL handles the comma separated tables (might also be a cross join) ...

     from owners o,
          join cat_owners co on o.owner_id = co.owner_id
          join cats cat on cat.cat_id = co.cat_id
          join cat_owner_statuses cos on XXXXX
          join cat_statuses cs on XXXXX,
          join owner_statuses os on XXXXX
     where cos.last_visit >= sysdate - 4/24
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You don't have a relation for several of your tables (such as cat_statuses) so a product join is returning zillions of rows. Perhaps you need to join through the table named cat_vets in your Fiddle example.

At the very least, you should move the outer where condition into the derived table query; having it outside is inefficient.

share|improve this answer
    
where would you propose putting the outer where? The issue is I need the latest is_alive status, not the first one that meets the criteria. –  Woot4Moo Nov 20 '12 at 18:34

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