Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have to write a little command line FTP client for linux in C. It works quite well for common uses (directory managing, retrieving and storing files, etc.), and I want to add the active mode (at the moment every transfer is made under passive mode).
I know that I have to send a command in the shape of :

PORT a,b,c,d,e,f

where a b c d are the ip address blocks and e f the port numbers. However, as I understand it, the ip has to be the ip of the machine on which my client is running, but I've been advised to use getsockname(). From what I've tested, getsockname() gets me the local ip of the interface(s) used by my socket, not my ip seen from the internet. So I can't give this ip address for the server to connect.

The question is : am I understanding the command PORT correctly, and how to get the correct ip to send it ?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

FTP active mode means that a server opens a connection to a client and sends data ifself. It's often unpractical, so the passive mode was invented: server opens an additional port which listens for incoming connections and starts transmission when someone is connected.

So, a passive mode session looks like this:

$ telnet localhost 21
220 Welcome to EarlGray FTP
USER ftp
331 Please specify the password.
PASS ftp
230 Login successful.
PASV 
227 Entering Passive Mode (127,0,0,1,185,37).
LIST
150 Here comes the directory listing.
            ---> here client opens another telnet session, 
            ---> connecting to the same server on port 185*256+37, specified by server:
              $ telnet localhost $((185 * 256 + 37))
              Trying 127.0.0.1...
              Connected to localhost.
              Escape character is '^]'.
              drwxrwxr-x    2 121      1003         4096 Aug 21 10:57 incoming
              drwxrwxr-x    7 0        1003         4096 Nov 09 21:04 pub
              Connection closed by foreign host.
            <---- end of data transfer session

226 Directory send OK.

Whereas an example of an active session:

$ telnet localhost 21
Trying 127.0.0.1...
Connected to localhost.
Escape character is '^]'.
220 Welcome to EarlGray FTP
USER ftp
331 Please specify the password.
PASS ftp
230 Login successful.
PORT 127,0,0,1,45,45                      (ports are specified by client)
200 PORT command successful. Consider using PASV.
LIST
150 Here comes the directory listing.

        ---> here client listens for an incoming connection on port 45*256+45
          $ nc -l 0.0.0.0 $((45 * 256 + 45))
          drwxrwxr-x    2 121      1003         4096 Aug 21 10:57 incoming
          drwxrwxr-x    7 0        1003         4096 Nov 09 21:04 pub
        <--- data are rececived

226 Directory send OK.

P.S. FTP is a very old protocol (definition from circa 1970), defined when there were no routers, gates and other transport level goodies, usually there were several machines, directly connected, so the active mode worked quite well, the passive mode is how the protocol survives today.

So, yes, you've gotten PORT command right, but there's no uniform way to get your external IP (there may be several your IPs in several different networks on local machine, there may be several gates with their own networks on the way to server, which one do you want to use?). The second part of the question, how to get your IP as it is seen by server, can't be answered (that's what the passive mode is for).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I got that right (and working for the passive mode), but I was more asking from a programmation point of view, how to know my ip to specify to the server ? It may be or may be not in the same local network (anyway I am accessing it from its hostname and not its ip), and I don't know about the NAT ; it's my university's server (I am testing from inside and outside the uni). –  teh internets is made of catz Nov 20 '12 at 21:38
    
@tehinternetsismadeofcatz You just can't use active mode if your host is not accessible from the server directly. That's the reason for passive mode existence. NATs track connections from inside to determine how to route the answer, but they do not provide means to establish a connection to a point behind. –  EarlGray Nov 20 '12 at 21:48
    
Well, this is a guideline to enhance my client : when basics are done (this is my case), try to implement active mode. So I guess it should work straightforward, if I can get my IP address :D –  teh internets is made of catz Nov 20 '12 at 23:04
    
continue : I can also try to connect on my internet supplier's ftp server from my home ; there should be no problem with NAT ? –  teh internets is made of catz Nov 20 '12 at 23:10
    
@teh internets is made of catz No, it will not work straight forward if you just get your external IP address. The router which owns that external IP address does not know that it should forward a particular port that your machine is listening on. That router will only do that if it has special support for NAT'ing active FTP, in which case you do not need to use the external IP address as the router will rewrite it. –  nos Nov 21 '12 at 9:32
add comment

If you are behind a NAT, it's the NAT responsability to break the end-to-end principle^W^W^W^WNAT the address in PORT/226 commands/responses. That NAT should support FTP explicitely.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.