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Let's say I have a class called Number, and I intend to do a lot of equality comparisons of Number objects. I am concerned about the "overhead" (class comparison, etc...) of the generic Number::equals(Object o) method. In this case, is it useful to provide a method such as Number::isEqualTo(Number other) as an alternative to Number::equals(Object o)? Is this a common pattern? Or do JVMs currently optimize well enough that there is no advantage to doing this?

Here's a code example:

public class Number {
    int _value;

    Number(int value) {
        _value = value;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(final Object o) {
        if (o == this) return true;
        if (o == null) return false;
        if (o.getClass() != getClass()) return false;
        return isEqualTo((Number)o);
    }

    public boolean isEqualTo(final Number other) {
        return _value == other._value;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Number one = new Number(1);
        Number two = new Number(2);
        if (!one.isEqualTo(two)) {
            System.out.println("fast comparison?");
        }
        if (!one.equals(two)) {
            System.out.println("slow comparison?");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
if you isEqualTo method is just going to do == anyways, just use == instead of a method. – zbrunson Nov 20 '12 at 18:29
    
If you're worried about performance, measure it. – dnault Nov 20 '12 at 18:30
    
You could measure the performance difference of both methods, shouldn't be hard – leo Nov 20 '12 at 18:31
    
Also, don't call your class Number, that name's taken already. – arshajii Nov 20 '12 at 18:32
    
Just remember that by doing that, you're providing an equality check that might be inconsistent with the equals check, that's widely used by default in Java. This can lead to contradictions and hard-to-detect bugs. Make sure that both methods return consistent results. – Gamb Nov 20 '12 at 18:32
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You may even provide an overload of equals itself: equals(Number). If you implement it very carefully (to be behaviorally indistinguishable from equals(Object)), you can achieve a minuscule speedup by avoiding a checked downcast in certain cases. Note that you are still going to have to check a.getClass() == b.getClass() so the difference is vanishingly small.

share|improve this answer
    
If I make Number a final class (reasonable for my case, which isn't actually a simple "number") can I avoid the getClass() comparison? – dsmith Nov 20 '12 at 18:36
    
Yes, then you'd have it guaranteed that any o instanceof Number has o.getClass() == Number.class. – Marko Topolnik Nov 20 '12 at 18:39

The two methods have different semantic:

  • equals has the semantic dictated by the Object::equals contract, while
  • isEqualTo has the semantic that applies exclusively to Number objects

Since the comparison is not apples-to-apples, it is fair that equals would require more CPU cycles. It is unlikely that you would notice the difference, however.

It is far more common for classes like yours to implement Comparable<T>. The semantic there calls for an ordering check, not just for an equality checks, but there is no requirement to take objects of unknown classes, letting you save CPU cycles.

You should have a good reason to provide an alternative to equality (e.g. a profiler run that points to equals(Object) as a bottleneck, a perceived improvement on readability due to the change, or achieving richer semantic due to adopting an interface that does more). Doing it for the sake of cutting a few CPU cycles would premature optimization.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yep. (I would also totally expect JVMs to optimize almost all the overhead of the class comparison away.) – Louis Wasserman Nov 20 '12 at 20:43

A quick microbenchmark with the most unfavourable scenario (equals always calls isEqualTo) shows (in ms):

equals: 1014
isEqualTo: 1010

Bottom line: unless your program doesn't do anything else, this is not going to be a performance bottleneck and you should stick to the first principle of optimisation: profile first, then optimise what needs to be optimised.

Test code:

public class TestPerf {

    private static int NUM_RUN;
    private static List<Number> list = new ArrayList<>();

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        NUM_RUN = 100_000;

        for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++) {
            list.add(new Number(i));
        }

        long sum = 0;
        System.out.println("Warmup");

        for (int i = 0; i < NUM_RUN; i++) {
            sum += method1(17);
            sum += method2(17);
        }

        System.gc();

        System.out.println("Starting");

        sum = 0;
        long start = System.nanoTime();
        for (int i = 0; i < NUM_RUN; i++) {
            sum += method1(17);
        }
        long end = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println("equals: " + (end - start) / 1000000);

        System.gc();

        start = System.nanoTime();
        for (int i = 0; i < NUM_RUN; i++) {
            sum += method2(17);
        }
        end = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println("isEqualTo: " + (end - start) / 1000000);

        System.out.println(sum);
    }

    private static int method1(int target) {
        int sum = 0;
        Number comparison = new Number(target);
        for (Number n : list) {
            if (n.equals(comparison)) sum++;
        }
        return sum;
    }

    private static int method2(int target) {
        int sum = 0;
        Number comparison = new Number(target);
        for (Number n : list) {
            if (n.isEqualTo(comparison)) sum++;
        }
        return sum;
    }

    public static class Number {

        int _value;

        Number(int value) {
            _value = value;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean equals(final Object o) {
            if (o == this) return true;
            if (o == null) return false;
            if (o.getClass() != getClass()) return false;
            return isEqualTo((Number) o);
        }

        public boolean isEqualTo(final Number other) {
            return _value == other._value;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm afraid this might be dominated by list iteration logic. Maybe use an array instead? It could show a bit more difference. – Marko Topolnik Nov 20 '12 at 18:48
    
I think that the point is that this is an O(1) algorithm no matter what you do, so optimization is unlikely to yield any significant advantage. – Bailey S Nov 20 '12 at 18:50
1  
@BaileyS If an O(1) algo is used in each step of an O(n) algo, and is the dominant factor in it, then it does make a difference. – Marko Topolnik Nov 20 '12 at 18:59
1  
@BaileyS If, under the terms I have defined, we speed up the O(1) algo by a factor of ten, how much speedup will the O(n) algo receive? Moreover, the same logic applies to O(n^2) and any other complexity. – Marko Topolnik Nov 20 '12 at 19:12
1  
@BaileyS So even if my program runs ten times slower, I should still helplessly throw my hands into the air, whispering "I'm doomed! All my time is spent in an O(1) algorithm and you just can't improve an O(1) algorithm"? – Marko Topolnik Nov 20 '12 at 19:37

This depends on where you'd like to use a compare method.

Maybe you can use different implementations of a Comparator interface?

These can be used to eg. sort Lists.

share|improve this answer

Here is your first problem. Number is a class that already exists, it is the superclass of Integer, Double, Long, etc.... Therefore your question is very confusing, because everybody thinks you are talking about the standard library Number, not a wrapper around an integer.

If you do not override compareTo and equals, and rely on the Object compareTo and equals, it will not compare the contents of _value, but instead will simply tell you if you are dealing with the exact same instance of the class. So it isn't really a performance issue, it is a function issue.

If you need a wrapper class for an integer with highly optimized convenience methods, use Integer!!! The javadoc can be found here.

If you are going to override equals and compareTo, carefully RTFM.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Bailey. Sorry, I chose Number as an example class without performing due diligence. Should have gone with Foo. I'd change it but now all the answers are referring to Number. In my case, it is not a Number but a more complex type. I don't think I lack any fundamental understanding of equals() and compareTo(), though. – dsmith Nov 20 '12 at 18:52
    
The question makes more sense knowing that this is a complex class that is not Number. Considering that we are comparing an O(1) algorithm with an O(1) algorithm, I would highly suggest implementing the code with equals() for the sake of clarity and consistency, and then profiling the code to satisfy yourself that everything is ok. I have never heard of a pattern like this to avoid a couple of instructions. – Bailey S Nov 20 '12 at 19:03

xx.isEqualTo.yy is an comparison on "object" level. It simply checks whether this two object are referring the same object.

It is always better to write 'equations methods' for specific classes. For example in this case optimal comparison is simply ==.

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